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Firefox Bon Echo Alpha 3 Milestone Released

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Bon Echo Alpha 3 is the third developer milestone focused on testing the core functionality provided by many new features and changes to the platform scheduled for Firefox 2.

New features and changes in this milestone that require feedback include:

Built in Anti-Phishing protection.
Search suggestions now appear with search history in the search box for Google and Yahoo!
Support for client-side session and persistent storage.

More at the Developer Center.


A not-for-profit company that uses software written by volunteers is proving a challenge to Bill Gates, says Andrew Murray-Watson.

Rather than rake in fat profits from the internet, Mozilla wants to keep it free. The organisation is a not-for-profit group and uses open-source software to develop Firefox. Open-source material is accessible to anyone who wants it in order to develop a piece of software.

Unlike rival Microsoft, which employs a legion of highly paid software engineers, Mozilla relies on a small internal team and the goodwill and hard work of tens of thousands of unpaid volunteers to create its products. Profit, dividends and returns on investment do not enter the equation. All of which means that Baker, who is a trapeze artist in her spare time (she tries to "fly" at least twice a week), is quite possibly Bill Gates's worst nightmare.

"We built that browser for the good of the internet itself," says Baker.

Firefox snaps at Microsoft's heels.

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