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Build It Yourself: A Linux Network Appliance

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Practically Networked invites to join our new series on how to build your own Linux-based network appliance. If you're a small business owner with a shared Internet connection and some networked PCs, this is just what you need to secure your LAN with a powerful, flexible device that outperforms comparable commercial devices for a fraction of the cost, or even no cost at all.

We'll take you step-by-step through the entire process. You don't need to be an ace Linux or networking guru. All you need is some experience with computers and to not be afraid to roll up your sleeves and wade in.

You may be wondering why you should use Linux for this project: Because it's the best tool for the job.


You'll need two PCs
AMD K6, Pentium II or Celeron CPU
64 megabytes of RAM
10-gigabyte hard drive
Two Ethernet cards, different brands that use different drivers

Full Story.

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