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Windows Vs. Linux

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Linux

I have always been fascinated with Linux. And if I had to tell you the number of times it literally saved my behind! Most people to whom I talk (enthusiastically I might add) about Linux, they all have the same comment: “Linux is hard to use�. Now, I must say that it is one of the biggest myths in the world. The only difference between Windows and Linux is in the choices we make. And Choice is the power of Linux. When you have a Windows machine, you have the choice between, well, the Windows interface and… the Windows interface. Sure, some would argue that there is XP Home, XP Pro, XP Media, XP Corp, 2003 Server, etc. But to me, it’s still the same thing. When you startup, they all look pretty much the same, you program them the same, they take about the same amount of resources (maybe except server editions), thus require the same basic minimum hardware.

But with Linux, things sure are different! Do you want ease of use? Do you have a low powered machine? Do you want to do supercomputing on a budget? Do you enjoy the command line? Do you want a small simple server for a networked printer and file sharing? Those are only a few of the questions to answer before choosing a distribution. And with the Live CD’s, you can try before you commit to the switch!

Full Story.

Re: Awaiting the Day

miscreant7 wrote:

hardware support has gotten so much better to the point that it's mostly a non-issue, but I believe it will be the games that push the scales over to linux.

Well, I don't think that's gonna happen. There will always be the nice little projects as we find discussed on linux-gamers, but I don't see the big commercial guys caring too much about linux. For a while it looked like they were coming around, but last I heard about id software, they weren't even gonna spend too much time on windows pc development anymore. They stated they were gonna focus on consoles - and namely the xbox360. I'm almost afraid we've seen the last of doom and quake releases for the linux pc.

Re: Awaiting the Day

Well, the thing of that is, while the games that are delivered by "the big guys" can certainly be great, I foresee a resurgence of the small programming team/individual programmer writing pc games.

Yes, consoles seem to be where the money is at, but let's look at it from a historical perspective. Lone programmers came up with Pong, Pacman, Frogger, and all those really-super-classic games on their personal computers or their allocated space on mainframes. Companies turn around and release console versions. Consoles reign supreme for a while, although the homebrew community keeps it going on the Commodore 64. All of a sudden, computers take a big leap in processing ability, and the good games are shareware developed not by big companies, but smaller ones. We see the release of Simcity, Wolfenstein 3D, Doom, Quake... and the PC is suddenly the gaming platform of choice. Since then, it's been a back-and-forth between the customizable games but somewhat poorer interface of the PC, and the easily used but much more limited power of the consoles. What I'm seeing happening, is that as these big name companies focus on creating games for the consoles, people like me who are capable of creating games but have limited resources for acquiring SDKs for the PS3 and Xbox 360 will have the opportunity to move into the vacuum on the PC and experiment on a community that has acquired the hardware to game, and are now being neglected.

I think that such games as Unreal Tournament, Quake, and America's Army have shown the potential of gaming on Linux. Unfortunately, we've been copycats... for the most part, the games that were meant for Linux are such notables as Kbounce and Tuxracer (not exactly the powerhouses that sparked gaming on Windows.) What I think we're missing is that killer app... the one that will make the game developer turn his head and say "Wow. I've gotta do better than that."

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