Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Unix, Linux Mythology Continues to Unfold

Filed under
Linux

The problem for Sun and, to a lesser extent, SGI is that for too long, they competed against a brain trust in Redmond, Wash., and not the global brain trust that was creating Linux. Therefore, they weren't prepared for how quickly it undercut their business. Linux has forced both SGI and Sun to adopt a "we do Linux better" strategy. The word "Unix" is never uttered.

Unix fans have been on the ropes of late. SGI declared bankruptcy earlier this month. In April, ongoing financial problems at Sun Microsystems led to an executive shakeup. It's not surprising to see the two highest-profile Unix-identified vendors in trouble. Things are not looking that bright for Unix anywhere.

Although a few folks at Microsoft might think they've had a hand in Sun's and SGI's misfortunes, they'd be wrong. Linux is the culprit. As in some Greek myth, Linux, the unwanted child of Unix, is putting Unix vendors to death.

Helps to Be Lucky

A look at the Top500 list of supercomputers tells the tale best. In 1998, Unix machines from Sun and SGI combined for 46 percent of the 500 fastest computers in the world. Linux accounted for one (0.2 percent).

In 2005, Sun had 0.8 percent -- or four systems -- and SGI had 3.6 percent, while 72 percent of the Top500 ran Linux.

More at technewsworld.

More in Tux Machines

The Internet Without Connection, Free Endless OS For Emerging Markets

There are four billion people on the planet without PCs or access to affordable personal computers. That figure should surely be tempered with some contextualization i.e. not everybody actually wants to have an Internet connection and many traditional, native or bucolic ways of live do still exist on the planet. Regardless, there are a batch of global initiatives in existence which seek to give computer access to every man, woman and especially child. Endless OS is one such project. The free operating system has been designed explicitly to work in the expensive or restrictive Internet data conditions that often exist in emerging markets where fabulously affordable broadband has yet to arrive. The software itself is built to provide useful information and educational content, with or without an Internet connection. Read more