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Issues with Kubuntu 14.10

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Linux

The first issue is fixed by installing the latest kdenlive and support files from the ppa:sunab repository. To do this, fire up konsole, and type:

sudo add-apt-repository ppa:sunab/kdenlive-release

Then press the Enter key, and type in your sudo user password.

You'll get some feedback from the sunab site. Press Enter again to add the repository to Kubuntu.

Now tell Kubuntu to update your package list:

sudo apt-get update

Now tell Kubuntu to install the latest Kdenlive software:

sudo apt-get install kdenlive

Accept all packages that need to be installed.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

The second issue requiring the sudo password to mount an nfs share is more problematic. I have 2 desktop and 3 laptop computers at home, all running Linux. Not all the users at my house have sudo root rights. We have a Synology NAS with an NFS shared drive so we can all access family photos and other documents. And Kubuntu 14.10 won't allow you to mount that share automatically on power up by putting the proper entry into the /etc/fstab file. I've not found a fix for this one.

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Kubuntu

I upgraded a Kubuntu machine some weeks ago and found some issues, even though I'd mostly attribute them to a bad hard drive (faulty sectors). The previous upgrade of Kubuntu on that machine left me with a bad MBR that made it impossible to boot until I found some solution on Google.

I never had issues with clean installs of Kubuntu, not any critical issues anyway.

I found kdenlive to be quite buggy and unstable and now use openshot, which can also be unstable at times.

Kubuntu 14.10--A lot to like...some to dislike

Yes, I chose to do a clean install of Kubuntu 14.10 rather than update 14.04.

Yes, I do like Kubuntu 14.10. I like the well-updated yet stable KDE. I like the up-to-date programming libraries for Ruby, Python, and other development environments.

However, the proper mounting of my network-nas(Synology) nfs share does drive me crazy. It worked fine in Kubuntu 14.04. I'm sure that being a 'buntu, it will soon be corrected.

For Kdenlive, the issue is often due to libraries Kdenlive depends on to function. When those drivers, libraries, and codecs are updated, Kdenlive can be left hanging. I do, generally, find Kdenlive to work well enough. I've dabbled with Openshot and Pitivi for video editing, but usually return to Kdenlive for the bulk of it. Kdenlive has become more stable with time. I also own Lightworks video editing software, but it's more of a geniune professional editing tool, and takes a lot of work to master.

Anyway, the sunlab ppa repository fixed my issue with Kdenlive.

My other favorite distro is Mageia, and I usually have a couple of machines running that. Also, I like some of the (more user-friendly) distros based on Arch linux, such as Manjaro.

I'm at heart a KDE guy, and over the last 4 years, Kubuntu has generally been my goto distro.

Plasma 5?

We're both using KDE here (on all 3 PCs). I spent a long time trying to figure out how to do things in Kdenlive and I gave up on it after it had crashed quite a few times (that was about 4 years ago).

The mounting issue that you've highlighted sounds like it can be worked around and is not a critical nuisance. No system is perfect and I too still have some niggled to deal with (like KMix taking up far too much RAM on this laptop). After experiencing the same issues for quite some time one gets accustomed to the workarounds.

Do you use Plasma 5?

Re: Plasma 5?

This is my daily dependent machine..so no plasma 5 yet.

It's Ubuntu Linux with the

It's Ubuntu Linux with the KDE Desktop Environment suite, insteal of Gnome. I have installed regular Ubuntu and have installed KDE version 3.2.3 I guess there is no difference between my Ubuntu and Kubuntu.
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