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Can Ubuntu jump from community to commercial?

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Ubuntu

Anyone who follows Linux closely knows that Ubuntu is the most popular community distribution. But, is that enough for Ubuntu to make a go of it as a commercial business distribution? It looks like we're going to get to find out.

Canonical Ltd., Mark Shuttleworth's UK-based company, has never made a secret of the fact that it has intended to support Ubuntu both as a free of cost Linux and as a commercial venture.

That last part, though, has often been overlooked. During the last year-and-a-half, however, it has become clear that Canonical is moving toward making a real business of providing commercial support and customized distributions for business Ubuntu users.

Specially, Shuttleworth has said, in his Ubuntu wiki, that Canonical "will never introduce a 'commercial' version of Ubuntu.

Full Story.

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