Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Unreal Championship 2

Filed under
Reviews
Gaming

As you might already be expecting, it's a game best played with your mates, and unlike previous UT or UC titles, the need to play it multiplayer is probably even more marked here thanks to a fairly short single-player campaign that really knows how to bust your balls, despite being something of a glorified training ground.

The story-lead Ascension Rites kicks off proceedings with a typically earnest sci-fi yarn that an equal number of people will get and the other half will be rolling their eyes between fits of giggles, so we'll leave it up to you to decide which 'camp' you're in. It's not really important why you're tasked with shooting people for sport; it's just more arena based combat, okay? Get over the fact that the protagonist Anubis wants to assert his masculinity and prove he's got the correct amount of testosterone pumping around his torso, or that his uber-breasted ex Selket is a bit of a sour puss. There's killing to be done. Flags to capture, heads to be sniped.

Although a selection of familiar weapons make their comeback (Stinger, Flak Cannon, Rocket Launcher, Sniper, etc.), they play an almost equal role. While, yes, it is possible to just play the game as a straight-down-the-line FPS, it's fair to say you won't be getting the most out of what there is to experience here - and besides, sometimes you won't even have a weapon at your disposal, so it's best to try and get on with the melee combat as early as possible for when it's the only thing available to you.

Soon enough you're engaging in a selection of familiar ladder matches, getting to grips with the third-person perspective, and working out whether it makes much difference to shoot in first-person or not. The choice is yours, and although you can switch between the two with the touch of a button, it's a little jarring to even have to think about it. Probably the game's central problem is that the learning curve is steep enough for it to be a tough game to learn to love. Regardless of whether you've played first person shooters for the last 13 years, this isn't a game you can just jump into and expect to gel with immediately - mainly because there's a lot more to it than meets the eye, and the game doesn't exactly make it easier for you by populating it with some impressively tough AI bots.

Full Article

More in Tux Machines

today's howtos

Linux 4.15, Linux 4.16, and Linux Foundation's CNCF and CII

  • Linux 4.15 Gets Fixed To Report Current CPU Frequency Via /proc/cpuinfo
    A change recently in the Linux kernel led the CPU MHz reported value via /proc/cpuinfo to either be the nominal CPU frequency or the most recently requested frequency. This behavior changed compared to pre-4.13 kernels while now it's been fixed up to report the current CPU frequency.
  • Linux 4.16 Will Be Another Big Cycle For Intel's DRM Driver
    We are just through week one of two for the Linux 4.15 merge window followed by eight or so weeks after that before this next kernel is officially released. But Intel's open-source driver developers have already begun building up a growing stack of changes for Linux 4.16 when it comes to their DRM graphics driver.
  • CNCF Wants You to Use 'Certified Kubernetes'
  • Open Source Threat Modeling
    Application threat modeling is a structured approach to identifying ways that an adversary might try to attack an application and then designing mitigations to prevent, detect or reduce the impact of those attacks. The description of an application’s threat model is identified as one of the criteria for the Linux CII Best Practises Silver badge.

Linux World Domination and Microsoft Corruption in Munich

Programming/Development: 'DevOps', NumPy, Google SLING

  • 5 DevOps leadership priorities in 2018
    This week, DevOps professionals gathered in San Francisco to talk about the state of DevOps in the enterprise. At 1,400 attendees, the sold-out DevOps Enterprise Summit has doubled in size since 2014 – a testament to the growth of the DevOps movement itself. With an ear to this event and an eye on the explosion of tweets coming out of it, here are five key priorities we think IT leaders should be aware of as they take their DevOps efforts into the new year.
  • NumPy Plan for dropping Python 2.7 support
    The Python core team plans to stop supporting Python 2 in 2020. The NumPy project has supported both Python 2 and Python 3 in parallel since 2010, and has found that supporting Python 2 is an increasing burden on our limited resources; thus, we plan to eventually drop Python 2 support as well. Now that we're entering the final years of community-supported Python 2, the NumPy project wants to clarify our plans, with the goal of to helping our downstream ecosystem make plans and accomplish the transition with as little disruption as possible.
  • Google SLING: An Open Source Natural Language Parser
    Google Research has just released an open source project that might be of interest if you are into natural language processing. SLING is a combination of recurrent neural networks and frame based parsing. Natural language parsing is an important topic. You can get meaning from structure and parsing is how you get structure. It is important in processing both text and voice. If you have any hope that Siri, Cortana or Alexa are going to get any better then you need to have better natural language understanding - not just the slot and filler systems currently in use.