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Bitnami: Making it easy and efficient to test server apps on your desktop and in the cloud

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Server
OSS

It's Friday morning and marketing tells you they need a Wordpress blog up and running by Monday and they want a theme like this and features like that and, and, and ... you've not got much time if you plan to have a weekend off so the last thing you’re going to want to do is work with a remote server. If you did you'd be loading themes one after another, testing them with various plugins, and generally beating the application into submission while dealing with the delays inherent in using a machine that’s somewhere out on the Internet. That would mean you’d be waiting just that little bit longer (or quite possibly, a lot longer) to do everything than you’d prefer.

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Standards/Consortia: Wi-Fi, E-mail and Hindi

  • Wi-Fi Certified 6 Program Available for Products based on Broadcom, Cypress, Intel, Marvell, and Qualcomm 802.11ax Chips

    Last year the WiFi alliance introduces a new naming scheme for WiFi using numbers instead of IEEE standards so that WiFI 4 is 802.11n, WiFi 5 is 802.11ac, and WiFi 6 is the latest 802.11ax standard...

  • The Wi-Fi 6 Launches Officially for the Next Generation of Wi-Fi

    Wi-Fi Alliance announced today the availability of the Wi-Fi CERTIFIED 6 certification program for vendors to provide customers with the latest and greatest Wi-Fi experience. Unveiled last year in October, Wi-Fi 6 (also known as 802.11ax) launches officially today with up to 37 percent faster speeds than the previous Wi-Fi generation (802.11ac), increased bandwidth for greater performance with low latency, higher data rates for greater network capacity, as well as MU-MIMO (Multi-User Multiple Input Multiple Output) support for greater download performance on more devices at once.

  • Setting up a mail server with OpenSMTPD, Dovecot and Rspamd

    I’ll say it again:

    I don’t think that either one of the Big Mailer Corps are are evil or bad, I use some of their services on a daily basis, and most of the people operating them are genuinely seeking the greater good… however they have grown too big and there needs to be a balance in power because who knows how they’ll evolve in the next ten years, who knows how the politics of their home country will evolve in the next ten years, and recent news doesn’t paint them as heading in the right direction.

    I’ll conclude by recommanding that you see this excellent presentation by Bert Hubert (@PowerDNS_Bert) from PowerDNS, about how a similar problem is starting to happen with DNS and the privacy and tracking concerns that arise from this. Many, many, many key points are also valid for mail services.

  • #StopHindilmposition: Indian tweeps respond to Amit Shah's 'Hindi as national language' comment

    But, Twitter India doesn't agree. Why? India does not have a national language. Part XVII of the Indian Constitution designates Hindi as the 'official language' of the Union. And, English is used in official purposes such as parliamentary proceedings, judiciary, communications between the Central Government and a State Government. States within India have the liberty and powers to specify their own official language(s) through legislation. In addition to the official languages, the constitution recognises 22 regional languages, which includes Hindi but not English, as scheduled languages. The number of native Hindi speakers is about 25% of the total Indian population;

    The number of native Hindi speakers is only about 25 per cent of the total Indian population and 43 per cent of India’s population use Hindi as their first language. In some states, especially in the southern regions, Hindi is not used at all.

  • Hindi spoken most, can unite country: Amit Shah

    According to the Official Languages Act, 1963, Hindi and English are the official languages for the Union government and Parliament.

    A total of 22 languages of the country are recognised under the Eight Schedule of the Constitution.

Software: Lifeograph, LabPlot and LibreOffice

  • Lifeograph is an encrypted journal application for Windows, Linux and Android

    Keeping a journal is a nice way to reflect upon oneself. It can help you become a better person, nurture good habits, can be used for research, making budgets, make health related notes, or jot down anything else that you may want to keep a record of. When it comes to a diary application on computers, there aren't a lot of options. RedNotebook is probably the best one I have used. I wanted something better and that's how I stumbled across Lifeograph.

  • Chocolatey package for LabPlot available

    While we’re spending quite some time now finalizing the next release of LabPlot which will be announced soon, we continue getting feedback from our users and we try to incorporate as much as possible into the upcoming release. This feedback usually consists of different discussions around the existing features in LabPlot or features that need to be added in near future, around bugs, etc. Recently we’ve got a somewhat different feedback informing us about the availability of a Chocolatey package for LabPlot.

  • LineStyle Extension for LibO

    I update the LineStyles for LibreOffice for the 6.4 release but in addition I made an Extension for all users how like to have > 20 different predefined LineStyles.

  • BPMN Shapes for LibreOffice

    Two months ago I post my todo list for LibreOffice 6.4 and I my work is already available via LibreOffice extensions.

Canonical/Ubuntu: Design and Web, Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter and Introduction to MicroK8s

  • Design and Web team summary – 17 September 2019

    This was a fairly busy two weeks for the Web & design team at Canonical. Here are some of the highlights of our completed work.

  • Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter Issue 596

    Welcome to the Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter, Issue 596 for the week of September 8 – 14, 2019. The full version of this issue is available here.

  • Introduction to MicroK8s – Part 1/2

    Every developer, systems admin and tech enthusiast is interested in learning Kubernetes. Kubernetes is a complex container orchestration tool that can be overwhelming for beginners. Kubernetes has been the buzzword in the tech industry and for good reason. If you’re itching to get started with Kubernetes and not looking forward to the complexities involved, this first blog of a series is for you. We’ll walk you through getting up and running in a jiffy with a Kubernetes deployment using MicroK8s. The following blogs will do a deeper dive into add-ons and usage.

Linux 5.4 Developments Explained

  • Linux 5.4 Adds Qualcomm Snapdragon 855, Supports Some Newer ARM Laptops

    The ARM SoC platform and driver changes landed on Monday during the first full day of the Linux 5.4 merge window. There is some exciting ARM hardware support improvements for this kernel while doing away with some older platforms.

  • Linux 5.4 Continues Sound Open Firmware, Improvements For AMD/NVIDIA HDMI Audio

    Linux 5.4 will sound better. Well, at least provide audio support on more hardware with this next kernel release thanks to the latest batch of open-source sound improvements.

  • Linux 5.4 Dropping Support For The Itanium IA64-Powered SGI Altix

    With Intel having ended the Itanium CPU family at the beginning of the year and much of the open-source/Linux software support for IA64 already having been on the decline for years, the Linux kernel is beginning to remove more IA64 bits. This comes following IA64 support being deprecated for GCC 10 and likely removed for the GCC 11 release in 2021. Once that IA64 support is gone from GCC, chances are the Linux kernel support for IA64 will be dropped entirely since there isn't any other compiler capable of building the Linux kernel and supporting IA64 as well as GCC.

  • Linux 5.4 Scheduler Changes Bring Better AMD EPYC Load Balancing, Other Optimizations

    The Linux 5.4 scheduler changes are fairly exciting on multiple fronts. One of the Linux 5.4 scheduler changes we have been looking forward to is improved EPYC load balancing and that work is indeed part of today's pull request. The better EPYC load balancing is a scheduler topology improvement to better deal with load balancing across NUMA nodes on EPYC 2P servers. I'll be running some benchmarks of this EPYC-specific scheduler change in the days ahead.