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KDE and Business: AEI Interview

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KDE

Continuing in a series of interviews with businesses that benefit KDE and benefit from KDE, we investigate AEI (Analytical Engineering, Inc), a Midwestern engineering firm founded in 1994. In an interview originally conducted by Aaron Seigo, AEI's design engineer and author Caleb Tennis discusses AEI's IT needs and KDE's involvement.

How is KDE helping AEI meet its IT needs, and how long has AEI been using KDE?

CT: Having a very easy to use GUI for the test cells is very important to us. Our test cell computers operate in what I call "pseudo-kiosk" mode. That is, most of the desktop features of KDE aren't used much, but they are available. Instead, all of the operation is done via a few custom written applications. The widgets that are available, and the ease of customizing new widgets, is a huge plus.

A polished look helps a lot too. Not only does it make life very simple for the operator, but eye candy is actually quite important from a business perspective. Potential clients on plant tours tend to remember catchy things they've seen, and almost every computer in our test facility that controls something uses KDE.

What were the key factors that led you to choose to deploy KDE at AEI?

Full Story.

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