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Bored with Distros, China Tries Again, and Recompiling Kernels

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Today in Linux news Fedora Project leader Matthew Miller says folks are bored with Linux distributions. After the Red Flag failure, China is looking to develop another homegrown operating system. Paul Venezia has more on the raging systemd wars and the Linux Tycoon says recompiling the kernel is getting him down. And finally tonight, NetworkWorld has the top 10 things you should know about Red Hat 7.

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More in Tux Machines

GNOME/GSOC Development and Cascade Windows in GNOME Shell

  • Code Search for GNOME Builder : GSOC 2017
    I am very happy to be part of GNOME and Google Summer of Code 2017. First of all, thank you for all GNOME members for giving me this opportunity and Christian Hergert for mentoring and helping me in this project. In this post I will introduce my project and approach for doing this project. Goal of the project is to enhance Go to Definition and Global Search in GNOME Builder for C/C++ projects. Currently in GNOME Builder, using Go to Definition one can go from reference of a symbol to its definition if definition is there in current file or included in current file. In this project, Go to Definition will be enhanced and using that one can go from reference of a symbol to its definition which can be present in any file in the project. Global Search will also be enhanced by allowing to search all symbols in the project fuzzily right from search bar.
  • [Older] GSOC 2017: And so it begins
    But let’s start from the beginning. Only 4 months ago, I was making my first steps as a contributor in the open-source world. One of the first things I discovered is how amazing and helpful the GNOME community is. I started by trying out a lot of GNOME apps and looking through the code behind them and that’s how I discovered Pitivi, a really great video editing solution. After my first patch on Pitivi got accepted, I was really hooked up. Fast forward a couple of patches and now I have the opportunity and great pleasure to work on my own project: UI for the Ken Burns effect, after being accepted for Google Summer of Code 2017. In this amazing journey, I’ve had some great mentoring: special thanks to Thibault Saunier (thiblahute), who is also my current mentor for GSOC 2017, and Alexandru Balut (aleb), who helped me along the way.
  • Pitivi: UI for the Ken-Burns effect
    It’s been three weeks since the coding period for GSOC 2017 started, so it’s time to show the world the progress I made. A short recap: I’ve been working on building a user interface which allows simulating the Ken-Burns effect and other similar effects in Pitivi. The idea is to allow adding keyframes on x, y, width, height properties of a clip, much like we are doing with other effects.
  • I Finally Found a Way to Cascade Windows in GNOME Shell [Ed: If your workflow involves "Cascade" like in Windows 3.1x, then you make poor use of virtual desktops, activities, etc.]

Red Hat: British Army Deal, Hyperconverged Infrastructure, OpenShift, Soaring Share Price, and Fedora

today's howtos

Servers: Infrakit & LinuxKit, CMTL, ServiceMaster, Synology, Ubuntu, and NeuVector

  • Why Infrakit & LinuxKit are better together for Building Immutable Infrastructure?
    Let us accept the fact – “Managing Docker on different Infrastructure is still difficult and not portable”. While working on Docker for Mac, AWS, GCP & Azure, Docker Team realized the need for a standard way to create and manage infrastructure state that was portable across any type of infrastructure, from different cloud providers to on-prem. One serious challenge is that each vendor has differentiated IP invested in how they handle certain aspects of their cloud infrastructure. It is not enough to just provision n-number of servers;what IT ops teams need is a simple and consistent way to declare the number of servers, what size they should be, and what sort of base software configuration is required. Also, in the case of server failures (especially unplanned), that sudden change needs to be reconciled against the desired state to ensure that any required servers are re-provisioned with the necessary configuration. Docker Team introduced and open sourced “InfraKit” last year to solve these problems and to provide the ability to create a self healing infrastructure for distributed systems.
  • CMTL Testing First Linux Based Intel® Server Board
    The board is designed for HPC workload environments requiring parallel computing processing performance. Up to 72 cores for optional support and 100Gb/s node interconnect. Six slots for DDR4, 2400Mhz registered ECC DIMMS to achieve a capacity of 384G.
  • [Older] DNS Infrastructure at GitHub
    At GitHub we recently revamped how we do DNS from the ground up. This included both how we interact with external DNS providers and how we serve records internally to our hosts. To do this, we had to design and build a new DNS infrastructure that could scale with GitHub’s growth and across many data centers.
  • ServiceMaster polishes DevOps process for Linux container security
    ServiceMaster Global Holdings Inc., which owns consumer brands such as Terminix, Merry Maids, Furniture Medic and ServiceMaster Clean and Restore, deploys 75,000 service trucks to residential driveways each day. Five years ago, the company was taken private by an equity firm, and new leadership, including a new CIO, was brought in to modernize its operations. When it returned to the public market in 2014, the company had completely overhauled its approach to IT.
  • My Love Affair with Synology
    In my "Hodge Podge" article in the October 2016 issue, I mentioned how much I love the Synology NAS I have in my server closet (Figure 1). I got quite a few email messages from people—some wanting more information, some scolding me for not rolling my own NAS, and some asking me what on earth I need with that much storage. Oddly, the Linux-running Synology NAS has become one of my main server machines, and it does far more than just store data. Because so many people wanted more information, I figured I'd share some of the cool things I do with my Synology.
  • Certified Ubuntu Cloud Guest – The best of Ubuntu on the best clouds
    Ubuntu has a long history in the cloud. It is the number one guest operating system on AWS, Azure and Google Cloud Platform. In fact there are more Ubuntu images running in the public cloud than all other operating systems combined. Ubuntu is a free operating system which means anyone can download an image, whenever they want. So why should cloud providers offer certified Ubuntu images to their customers?
  • Cloud Foundry and Kubernetes: Different Tools
    It’s difficult to compare programming languages and platforms, of course, but this was the analogy that most frequently came to mind last week. Cloud Foundry is unlikely to be as popular as it was shortly after it launched, when it was the only open source PaaS platform available. But this says little about Cloud Foundry, and more about the platform market which – like every other infrastructure market – is exploding with choice to the point of being problematic. It also ignores the ability for the Cloud Foundry foundation to actively embrace this choice via the addition of Kubo.
  • Ubuntu OpenStack Pike Milestone 2
    The Ubuntu OpenStack team is pleased to announce the general availability of the OpenStack Pike b2 milestone in Ubuntu 17.10 and for Ubuntu 16.04 LTS via the Ubuntu Cloud Archive.
  • NeuVector Releases Open Source Tools to Help Enterprises Evaluate Kubernetes 1.6 Deployments for CIS Benchmark Compliance