Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

12 Linux-Based Home Automation Systems for Under $300

Filed under
Linux

Home automation hubs have emerged as the tech startup product of choice in 2014, and most run on embedded Linux. The category has been re-energized with the dropping costs of wireless radios and embedded processors, as well as the ubiquity of readymade touchscreen interfaces in the form of Android and iOS devices. This slide show presentation covers 10 Linux-based and two Android-based home automation systems starting at under $300.

Home automation systems have been around for more than a decade, but were usually affordable only to a few. Early Linux-based products include the circa-2002 CorAccess Companion, as well as later tuxified products from Control4, such as the Control4 Home Controller HC-500. While the HC-500's $1,500 was a price breakthrough back in 2008, Control4's entry level system is now an HC-250 model selling for under $500 plus licensing. You'll find most of the systems listed here starting at under $200, with some hubs selling for as little as $49. Of course, you'll likely spend much more than that on compatible smart devices, and equipping a large home could easily push you over the $1,000 mark.

Read more

More in Tux Machines

Android/ChromeOS/Google Leftovers

Games: SC-Controller 0.4.2, Campo Santo, Last Epoch and More

Android Leftovers

Ryzen 7 2700X CPUFreq Scaling Governor Benchmarks On Ubuntu Linux

With this week's Ryzen 5 2600X + Ryzen 7 2700X benchmarks some thought the CPUFreq scaling driver or rather its governors may have been limiting the performance of these Zen+ CPUs, so I ran some additional benchmarks this weekend. Those launch-day Ryzen 5 2600X / Ryzen 7 2700X Ubuntu Linux benchmarks were using the "performance" governor, but some have alleged that the performance governor may now actually hurt AMD systems... Ondemand, of course, is the default CPUFreq governor on Ubuntu and most other Linux distributions. Some also have said the "schedutil" governor that makes use of the kernel's scheduler utilization data may do better on AMD. So I ran some extra benchmarks while changing between CPUFreq's ondemand (default), performance (normally the best for performance, and what was used in our CPU tests), schedutil (the newest option), and powersave (if you really just care about conserving power). Read more