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Yum's Successor, DNF 0.6, Brings Sought After Features

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Red Hat

Aleš Kozumplík announced the release of DNF 0.6 today with the version bump coming as a result of some user sought after functionality.

The main feature of DNF 0.6.0 is support for advisory listings via the updateinfo sub-command to DNF. This drop-in replacement to Yum also now supports the include configuration directive and there's improvements to group operations. A handful of bugs were also fixed by this latest release.

More details on DNF 0.6 can be found via this blog post and the release notes.

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