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OpenLogic Pays Qualified Community Experts to Support Open Source

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OpenLogic’s Unique “Expert Community” Program Taps Open Source Community to Provide Enterprise Support

BROOMFIELD, Colo. May 8, 2006 –OpenLogic, Inc., a leading provider of software, stacks and services that enable enterprises to easily deploy and manage customized open source environments, today announced the first program to provide consolidated, commercial-grade support across a wide range of open source products by tapping the open source development community for enterprise support. Through the OpenLogic Expert Community, OpenLogic will pay qualified experts within the open source development community to provide in-depth support for open source products.

OpenLogic currently offers enterprise support for more than 150 certified open source products - providing a single point of contact for enterprise open source issues. OpenLogic will continue to handle tier 1 and tier 2 support, while tapping the OpenLogic Expert Community for help in resolving more complex issues. OpenLogic will shepherd enterprise issues through the entire process to resolution, providing enterprises with the commercial-grade service levels they require.

The OpenLogic Expert Community currently has experts representing more than 50 leading open source projects, including Apache HTTP Server, Ant, Hibernate, MyFaces, Spring, Struts and Tomcat. To qualify as a member of the OpenLogic Expert Community, individuals must have “committer” status (enabling them to update source code for an open source product) or must be referred by a committer for one of the open source products supported and certified by OpenLogic. Interested open source developers can visit www.openlogic.com for more information.

Benefits for Open Source Community
The OpenLogic Expert Community is a new business model that directly compensates open source developers for their time in fixing enterprise issues. Open source companies have typically hired open source developers as employees, but OpenLogic’s innovative model enables community members to get rewarded for their support efforts without requiring them to switch jobs. In addition to payingJames Niccolai members of the OpenLogic Expert Community to resolve enterprise issues, OpenLogic will also contribute money for each issue resolved to a fund that will be used to help further open source efforts. This new business model will help to foster participation in the open source development community while removing one of the barriers to open source usage in the enterprise.

"As a long time user of OpenLogic's products, I really appreciate the work being done to put a commercial face on the open source software stack,” said Bruce Atherton, Apache Ant Committer and author of the Asterisk ICD module. “I think the integration efforts that OpenLogic has gone to, combined with the sophisticated support that it offers, is going to address some of the biggest concerns that large organizations have with the adoption of open source software.”

Benefits for Enterprises
From an enterprise perspective, the OpenLogic Expert Community will enable companies to further leverage open source software by providing broad access to commercial-grade support. Today, enterprises find it difficult to get commercial-grade support for most of the dozens, if not hundreds, of open source products they are using.

“We have heard loud and clear from our larger enterprise customers, some of whom are using more than 400 open source products, that they want one throat to choke for open source support,” said Steven Grandchamp, CEO of OpenLogic. “OpenLogic’s Expert Community program is being launched to help address this need in a new, creative way. Enterprises get the support they require and open source committers and contributors can earn money to support the work they love to do.”

In addition to consolidated support, OpenLogic offers a technology platform that offers customers a library of more than 150 pre-certified open source software packages, including the most popular open source databases, applications servers, IDEs and more. OpenLogic’s platform is flexible and extensible, enabling companies to build customized stacks by choosing any combination of open source, commercial and proprietary software.

About OpenLogic
OpenLogic is a leading provider of software, stacks and services that enable enterprises to easily customize, deploy and manage commercial-grade open source environments. OpenLogic’s software automates the integration and deployment of any combination of 150 pre-certified open source packages along with proprietary or commercial solutions. The OpenLogic solution also mitigates open source legal risks by enabling companies to manage and enforce open source policies. OpenLogic’s technical support and update services give enterprises the commercial-grade reliability they demand. OpenLogic is currently used by 700 customers worldwide. For more on OpenLogic, go to www.openlogic.com.

Bret Clement
Page One PR
303.462.3057
bret@pageonepr.com

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