Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

OpenLogic Pays Qualified Community Experts to Support Open Source

Filed under
OS

OpenLogic’s Unique “Expert Community” Program Taps Open Source Community to Provide Enterprise Support

BROOMFIELD, Colo. May 8, 2006 –OpenLogic, Inc., a leading provider of software, stacks and services that enable enterprises to easily deploy and manage customized open source environments, today announced the first program to provide consolidated, commercial-grade support across a wide range of open source products by tapping the open source development community for enterprise support. Through the OpenLogic Expert Community, OpenLogic will pay qualified experts within the open source development community to provide in-depth support for open source products.

OpenLogic currently offers enterprise support for more than 150 certified open source products - providing a single point of contact for enterprise open source issues. OpenLogic will continue to handle tier 1 and tier 2 support, while tapping the OpenLogic Expert Community for help in resolving more complex issues. OpenLogic will shepherd enterprise issues through the entire process to resolution, providing enterprises with the commercial-grade service levels they require.

The OpenLogic Expert Community currently has experts representing more than 50 leading open source projects, including Apache HTTP Server, Ant, Hibernate, MyFaces, Spring, Struts and Tomcat. To qualify as a member of the OpenLogic Expert Community, individuals must have “committer” status (enabling them to update source code for an open source product) or must be referred by a committer for one of the open source products supported and certified by OpenLogic. Interested open source developers can visit www.openlogic.com for more information.

Benefits for Open Source Community
The OpenLogic Expert Community is a new business model that directly compensates open source developers for their time in fixing enterprise issues. Open source companies have typically hired open source developers as employees, but OpenLogic’s innovative model enables community members to get rewarded for their support efforts without requiring them to switch jobs. In addition to payingJames Niccolai members of the OpenLogic Expert Community to resolve enterprise issues, OpenLogic will also contribute money for each issue resolved to a fund that will be used to help further open source efforts. This new business model will help to foster participation in the open source development community while removing one of the barriers to open source usage in the enterprise.

"As a long time user of OpenLogic's products, I really appreciate the work being done to put a commercial face on the open source software stack,” said Bruce Atherton, Apache Ant Committer and author of the Asterisk ICD module. “I think the integration efforts that OpenLogic has gone to, combined with the sophisticated support that it offers, is going to address some of the biggest concerns that large organizations have with the adoption of open source software.”

Benefits for Enterprises
From an enterprise perspective, the OpenLogic Expert Community will enable companies to further leverage open source software by providing broad access to commercial-grade support. Today, enterprises find it difficult to get commercial-grade support for most of the dozens, if not hundreds, of open source products they are using.

“We have heard loud and clear from our larger enterprise customers, some of whom are using more than 400 open source products, that they want one throat to choke for open source support,” said Steven Grandchamp, CEO of OpenLogic. “OpenLogic’s Expert Community program is being launched to help address this need in a new, creative way. Enterprises get the support they require and open source committers and contributors can earn money to support the work they love to do.”

In addition to consolidated support, OpenLogic offers a technology platform that offers customers a library of more than 150 pre-certified open source software packages, including the most popular open source databases, applications servers, IDEs and more. OpenLogic’s platform is flexible and extensible, enabling companies to build customized stacks by choosing any combination of open source, commercial and proprietary software.

About OpenLogic
OpenLogic is a leading provider of software, stacks and services that enable enterprises to easily customize, deploy and manage commercial-grade open source environments. OpenLogic’s software automates the integration and deployment of any combination of 150 pre-certified open source packages along with proprietary or commercial solutions. The OpenLogic solution also mitigates open source legal risks by enabling companies to manage and enforce open source policies. OpenLogic’s technical support and update services give enterprises the commercial-grade reliability they demand. OpenLogic is currently used by 700 customers worldwide. For more on OpenLogic, go to www.openlogic.com.

Bret Clement
Page One PR
303.462.3057
bret@pageonepr.com

More in Tux Machines

GNU/Linux Leftovers

  • Download Linux Voice issue 18
  • Windows desktop share falls below 90% [Ed: based on Microsoft-connected firm]
    The desktop share of Windows computers worldwide fell below 90 per cent for the first time since it established the mark, according to figures from the web analytics company Net Applications. While there were encouraging figures for Microsoft among the various Windows versions, the overall share fell to 89.23 per cent.
  • Linus Torvalds Announces Linux Kernel 4.6 RC6, Dubbed "Charred Weasel"
    It's Sunday night, so Linus Torvalds has announced the release of a new RC build for the upcoming Linux 4.6 kernel series, which has been dubbed "Charred Weasel." According to Linus Torvalds, things continue to remain fairly calm in the development cycle of Linux kernel 4.6, which might very well get one more Release Candidate (RC), version RC7, next week, on May 8, 2016. Then, one week later, on May 15, we should be able to get our hands on the final release of Linux kernel 4.6, which will hit the stable repositories of various distributions most probably around June 2016.
  • Reaper Audio Software Is Coming To Linux
    If Audacity and Ardour aren't cutting it for your audio editing needs on Linux, there's another Digital Audio Workstation (DAW) option coming to Linux: Reaper. Reaper is a high-end audio production software suite developed by Cockos Software. Reaper has been supported under Windows and OS X for this software that's been around since 2005. With the current development version, native Linux support is coming.
  • Plasma Mobile : New base system
    Last Akademy, the Plasma team revealed the first prototype of the new Plasma Mobile. [...] Our initial Ubuntu Touch base was Ubuntu 15.04. Eventually, our image started to diverge from the Ubuntu Touch base. For example, we upgraded libhybris to upstream version because libhybris available in Ubuntu archive diverged too much from upstream to be useful in our context. We also had to upgrade to a newer Qt version, and we also needed to upgrade the base system to Ubuntu 16.04 (Xenial Xerus) because we did not have the resources for managing different branches for packaging the latest git KF5/Plasma for 15.04.
  • Converging Kubes
    Kube, our PIM-Client in the making, is supposed to run on a variety of platforms and form-factors. We aim to provide a consistent look and feel across them all. If you know how to use Kube on your desktop machine, you will know how to use it on your Android phone or tablet as well. So what we are going to do, is building a UI for the phone, allowing it to display multiple pages on the tablet and in the end serving it on the desktop as well. Good idea, right?
  • openSUSE announces first round of accepted proposals
    The first round of proposals for the openSUSE Conference have been accepted and people who submitted a call for papers should log-in to events.opensuse.org and check to see if their talk has been accepted as part of the first round of proposals. For proposals that have been accepted, users should confirm their proposal as soon as possible and also register for the conference if they had not done so already.
  • Prepare your Raspberry Pi for space with an Astro Pi flight case
    One year ago this month, I published my first article on Opensource.com. I talked about our Astro Pi program in Students compete for a chance to have their Raspberry Pi code run in space. We've come a long way in that last 12 months—in December, our two Astro Pi units were sent to the International Space Station aboard the Cygnus spacecraft on a resupply mission; closely followed by British ESA astronaut Tim Peake.

Red Hat News

Android Leftovers

6 colleges turning out open source talent

Most IT departments have project road maps that will require open-source skills, but finding recent college grads with open source talent can be challenging. Whether your company is planning an open-source-based big data implementation, installing an open-platform file manager, or adopting an open approach to customer relationship management, experts say traditional computer science departments might not be turning out students you need. Read more