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Corebird, An Alternative GTK+3 Twitter Client

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Software

If you're like me, you may not have heard much about Corebird, a native GTK+3 Twitter client. Which is a bit surprising really, as Corebird is a very nice and stable application that holds it's own with any of the other clients out there and deserves more love.

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