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A Review of Bluefish

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Software

Bluefish, the GTK-based text editor tailored for dynamic web programming, includes most standard features like syntax highlighting and multiple documents, but also some very neat features such as integrated documentation, boilerplate code, and dialogs and wizards. In this article, we will evaluate Bluefish's unique features as well as its shortcomings.

Bluefish is an editor designed especially for writing code for websites — both static and dynamic. Unlike most free development tools on GNU/Linux, that are focused on more general programming, Bluefish is packed with useful features unique to the domain of web programming. Due to this focus, it can be much quicker to learn to use and become productive with, though it is aimed developers with some experience.

Bluefish is not a WYSIWYG editor; instead, it is `WYSIWYN' (What You See Is What You Need). Its advantages follow from this — a simple GUI, with easily accessible shortcuts to insert and edit code. It attempts to help the user concentrate on designing or engineering the code, rather than on physically typing and checking minor details.

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