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Bibble 4.7: RAW power for penguins

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Bibble Labs has released Bibble 4.7, a commercial program for processing and conversion of RAW digital photography files to publishable formats such as JPG, PNG, and TIFF. Since professional photo editing programs are far and few between on Linux, I decided to take a look at Bibble's Linux version to see how it handles.

The new version includes a new automatic image correction technology called Perfectly Clear. The most important innovations in two last versions are integrated Noise Ninja technology for the reduction of digital noise, support for dual-core processors, improved detail-saving in converted pictures, and a well-organized user interface.

Bibble comes in two versions -- a Lite version that sells for $69, and a Professional version for $129 that includes all the features of the Lite version plus multithreading, work queues, advanced copy and paste functionality, and support for tethered shooting.

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