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Linux Gets Native WiFi Support

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WiFi on Linux got a major boost today, as Devicescape Software donated technology to allow WiFi to run natively for the first time.

Running WiFi natively is considered critical for the open-source operating system to make further inroads in consumer and mobile devices, where Linux has had limited success. Until now, Linux required add-on software to work with WiFi such as hardware-specific drivers from chipmakers. That has translated into quality of service issues and spotty third-party support, which in turn have slowed market adoption.

Adding native support is considered critical for winning increased attention from Linux developers for WiFi, according to Dave Fraser, CEO of Devicescape. “Right now there is no direct access of digital media devices to Web-based services,” he said. “With MP3, digital cameras and voice over IP phones, they all work through a PC. But there is a capability for a new breed of devices to access services directly.”

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