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LA County Considering Open Source

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OSS

FCW.com is carrying a story describing how LA County is considering using open source software for it's many desktops in order to save millions of dollars. I think it's a good idea and hopefully will lead to a trend all over the country.

Hmmm

I think PCLinuxOS would be a perfect alternative for them! tee hee

re: Hmmm

You jest, but I think it would. They'll probably choose Redhat or some sh*t, but they should give pclos a whirl. Big Grin

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You talk the talk, but do you waddle the waddle?

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