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Tails 1.0 review – total privacy

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Reviews
Security
Debian

Tails has been a curiosity to us for a while now, long before Snowden made it known to the mainstream. Cropping up every now and then on Distrowatch, we acknowledged that it existed and its list of features seemed to convey that the team knew what they were doing in constructing an ultra-secure and privacy-driven Linux distro. Now post-Snowden and Heartbleed, with the need for journalists and whistleblowers to have true internet privacy, we’ve come to see Tails as a necessity in the changing tech world.

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