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Leftovers: Gaming

Filed under
Gaming
  • '7 Days to Die' Linux version on its way: Developer

    7 Days to Die was a Kickstarter project about an open world, voxel-based, sandbox game that is a unique mash up of First Person Shooter, Survival Horror, Tower Defense and Role Playing Games combining combat, crafting, looting, mining, exploration, and character growth. The developer had promised a Linux version of the game during its campaign period, saying that they would release a Linux version 2 months after the initial launch. But even after the game was launched, there were no signs of a Linux version or any communications from the company. Now, after a long hiatus, a developer has said that they are indeed working on a Linux version and it should be ready in a couple of weeks.

  • ‘Modern Combat 5: Blackout’ full title and story details emerge

    Gameloft recently dropped some more details on their upcoming game Modern Combat 5 which, Gameloft assures, is well on its way to be launched. This time around, Gameloft has released the full title and the story in which the game will take place. The new game is titled Modern Combat 5: Blackout.

  • Valve is the saviour of the PC: Brian Fargo

    In a recent interview with Eurogamer, Brian Fargo, the boss at inXile Entertainment, the developer of Wasteland 2, has hailed Valve as the “savior of the PC” due to their efforts in making digital distribution such a success.

  • 11bit Studios Talk About This War Of Mine & Games Republic Their New Store
  • Double Fine's New Game Hack 'N' Slash Has A Trailer, Game Out Next Month

    Double Fine sure do love Linux don't they! Hack 'N' Slash is looking good and will be release for Linux on the 6th of May, to go along with the release date we have a trailer for you!

    Looks like currently it will be a Steam only release, so you will have to hold out if you want it fully DRM free with no Steam attached.

  • Gigabyte's AMD Mini Gaming PC Gets A Downvote For Poor Linux Support

    This is fun, Ars Technica a rather big general tech news website has done a review of Gigabyte's AMD powered mini gaming box and give it a demerit for its poor Linux support.

  • Awesomenauts Major Update And Another On The Way For Linux

    For those not entirely up to date on their Awesomenauts, this month it received a whopper of an update and it might be time you gave it another go, especially with another major update looming.

  • Steam Has Greenlit 39 New Linux Games At The End Of April

    Wow Valve is on a roll for Linux gamers aren't they! 39 more Linux games have been lit up to be included on Steam's store.

More in Tux Machines

Security Leftovers

  • The road to hell is paved with SAML Assertions
    A vulnerability in Microsoft Office 365 SAML Service Provider implementation allowed for cross domain authentication bypass affecting all federated domains. An attacker exploiting this vulnerability could gain unrestricted access to a victim's Office 365 account, including access to their email, files stored in OneDrive etc.
  • Cisco Finds Backdoor Installed on 12 Million PCs
    Cisco started analyzing Tuto4PC’s OneSoftPerDay application after its systems detected an increase in “Generic Trojans” (i.e. threats not associate with any known family). An investigation uncovered roughly 7,000 unique samples with names containing the string “Wizz,” including “Wizzupdater.exe,” “Wizzremote.exe” and “WizzInstaller.exe.” The string also showed up in some of the domains the samples had been communicating with.
  • The "Wizzards" of Adware [Ed: unsurprisingly Windows]
  • All About Fraud: How Crooks Get the CVV
    A longtime reader recently asked: “How do online fraudsters get the 3-digit card verification value (CVV or CVV2) code printed on the back of customer cards if merchants are forbidden from storing this information? The answer: If not via phishing, probably by installing a Web-based keylogger at an online merchant so that all data that customers submit to the site is copied and sent to the attacker’s server.
  • Why We Should Be Worried About Ancient Viruses Infecting Power Plants [Ed: unsurprisingly Windows again]
    The reasons these patients are vulnerable to viruses like W32.Ramnit and Conficker is because they run legacy systems that haven’t been patched or updated for a decade. And that’s fine as long as the operators of the plant keep them isolated and assume they are insecure, hopefully keeping the more critical parts of the network away safer.
  • Magical Thinking in Internet Security
    Increased complexity without corresponding increases in understanding would be a net loss to a buyer. At scale, it's been a net loss to the world economy.
  • Edward Snowden: The Internet Is Broken
    In 2013, a now-infamous government contractor named Edward Snowden shined a stark light on our vulnerable communications infrastructure by leaking 10,000 classified U.S. documents to the world. One by one, they detailed a mass surveillance program in which the National Security Administration and others gathered information on citizens — via phone tracking and tapping undersea Internet cables. Three years after igniting a controversy over personal privacy, public security, and online rights that he is still very much a part of, Snowden spoke with Popular Science in December 2015 and shared his thoughts on what's still wrong and how to fix it.

Android Leftovers

GNOME News

  • A little update on transit routing in Maps
    I talked a bit with Mattias Bengtsson before, and since he had been contemplating using OpenTripPlanner (OTP) for his GSoC project a couple of year ago and found it didn't scale too well for general turn-based routing, he was quite excited about my idea of combing GraphHopper and OTP, using OTP with just transit data (loaded from GTFS feeds).
  • GNOME Software Update That Fixes Installing Third-Party Deb Files Lands In Ubuntu 16.04 Proposed Repository
    A GNOME Software update that fixes the issue with installing third-party deb files was pushed to the Ubuntu 16.04 Proposed repository a few minutes ago.
  • Introducing GNOME Software
    GNOME Software is a new software center ('add/remove programs' application) for any GNU/Linux system using GNOME desktop environment. At this time, there are just a few third-party reviews about GNOME Software. This article is a general beginner guide about how to use GNOME Software. For this purpose we use the GNOME Software in Ubuntu 16.04 Xenial Xerus. Thanks to the developers who created GNOME Software. We hope this article helps new users.

Leftovers: OSS

  • 1º Computer Science Week 2016
    And since the beginning, I had tried to bring the most of the content about Free Software ideology. And this time next week, it will start the 1º Computer Science Week, and what is more amazing is that this edition is bringing people from more there 14 cities around the state of Rio de Janeiro, for watch the talks. I didn’t expect that.
  • OpenDaylight as an NFV Controller
    In discussing our use cases, we’ve noticed that a key domain for OpenDaylight (ODL) is Cloud and NFV. ODL is closely tied to NFV and accordingly works very closely with the Open Platform for NFV (OPNFV), a related project with the Linux Foundation that concentrates on providing a carrier-grade, integrated, open source platform to accelerate the introduction of new NFV products and services.
  • Open, available & interoperable: How open source is transforming the data centre industry
    Analysis: From commercial to enterprise hubs, from smaller to bigger players, open source is gearing up to be the future of the data centre. The use of open source to design, build and deploy software and even hardware infrastructure in the data centre seems to be an accelerating trend amongst companies in the hosting space. Open source software revenues worldwide are expected to go beyond the $50bn barrier this year for the first time, according to Statista. By 2020, that value will rise to $57.3bn.
  • ​OwnCloud founder resigns from his cloud company
    Frank Karlitschek, ownCloud's founder and CTO, has resigned from his company. OwnCloud is a popular do-it-yourself infrastructure-as-a-service (IaaS) cloud.
  • 7 science projects powered by open source GIS
    Next week, FOSS4G North America is coming to Raleigh, NC. FOSS4G is a conference celebrating all of the ways that free and open source software are changing the world of geographic and geospatial information science (GIS). These days, with ever-expanding technologies for collecting geographic data, sensor networks and the Internet of Things are driving larger and larger quantities of data that must be stored, processed, visualized, and interpreted. Practically every type of industry imaginable is increasing the types and quantities of geographic data they utilize. And the traditional closed source tools of the olden days can no longer keep up. Many of the applications of geographic tools are scientific in nature, from biology to oceanography to geology to climatology. Here are seven applications for geographic science that I'm excited about hearing talks on next week.