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iPhone becomes victim of Android’s success, makes Apple worry

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Android
Mac

Apple, the world’s most valuable technology company, is worried these days and not without reason. Well, Android phones with either larger screens or lower prices than the iPhone are making the tech giant’s blood boil.

Internal Apple documents show that the company’s sales department is anxious about growing competition from Android-powered devices amidst declining iPhone sales, Re/code said in a report.

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