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Security: Unpatched and Doing Fine?

Filed under
Linux

It's been a year since the Honeynet project published the results of their study, which concluded that Linux systems can last much longer than Windows systems unpatched on the Internet. I am sure that to some extent this remains true, but I wonder when I see things such as statistics that claim the highest percentage of attacks are seen on Linux systems and the number two reason they are attacked is because they are unpatched.

This has long been a sore spot for me in the Linux world, not because Linux systems are "unsafe", but because patching (not just for enterprises, but even for home users) on Linux is a pain. Some versions are easier than others, but simply trying to get the patches and ensure that you don't break anything is usually a challenge. And I don't see it getting easier, either.

Just to prove my point, I took a gander at some patching methods for several different platforms:

Full Story.

*yawn*

I just read it...This is just a pointless whinge article. (And it smells like someone was hired by Microsoft to write this nonsense...Either that, or they really had no frigging clue to begin with).

In fact, its a non-issue. You pick a distro, you use it, you learn how to update it, you keep it secure. That's it.

Its a non-issue unless you keep moving distro to distro. If you stick with the one distro from the beginning, you'll do fine.

How hard is it to update "easy to use" distros like Ubuntu, OpenSUSE, etc? Its all clicking with the mouse! (Apparently, according to the article, that is still too hard. If that's hard, then how do people handle Windows Update via the "manually select patches to install" way?)

The article has very little substance, and doesn't offer anything but FUD tones to scare people about maintaining Linux systems.

Even for Gentoo...Is it hard to teach a newbie to type: emerge ?

1000 to 1 the author of that article has never touched a Linux system in their lives...Let alone write about it.

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