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The varied flights of Ubuntu Dapper Drake

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Ubuntu

The first time I got introduced to Ubuntu was when I installed Ubuntu Breezy 5.10 on my PC. And when Canonical released the beta version of the next major Ubuntu release called Dapper Drake, I decided to download and install it on one of the free partitions on my machine. On the other hand, I could have just upgraded from Ubuntu Breezy to Dapper Drake by modifying the sources.list file to point to dapper and then doing an apt-get dist-upgrade. But since Dapper Drake is still alfa release - its stable version is slated to be released in June - I felt it would be prudent to install it on a separate partition. The ISO image of Dapper drake I downloaded was named flight 4. In fact Canonical has chosen to call each succeeding stage of Dapper beta culminating to its final release in June this year as flights. So when I installed Dapper Drake flight 4, a couple of months back, I got the latest version of Gnome 2.14 bundled with it but not all the changes were included. For example, there was no integration of beagle search with nautilus file manager which is a feature of Gnome 2.14. This could be because Gnome 2.14 was released just before Dapper Drake flight 4 was released and so the developers had hastily bundled Gnome 2.14 in it and missed incorporating all the features.

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