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Android Smartphone shipment crosses 800 million

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Android
Linux
Google

The year 2013 has seen smartphones cross an important milestone. The global smartphone shipment hit the billion mark for the first time, with 800 million contributed by Android. It is clear that Android dominated the smartphone market with Apple’s iPhone shipments maxing out at 153.4 million. These stats are according to data published by IDC on Wednesday.

Out of the total 800 million units Samsung Electronics was responsible for making 39.5% of them, helping it keep the crown of largest smartphone manufacturer. Google and Samsung are guilty for taking 95.7% share in fourth quarter shipments in 2013. Both the companies together left Apple in the dust, where the world’s second most profitable company saw it’s smartphone market share drop from 18.7% to 15.2% last year.

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