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Canonical Explains Why Linux Mint and All Other Distros Must Sign a License Agreement

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Linux

Canonical has issued an official explanation for the reason why Linux Mint developers have to sign a license agreement in order to continue to distribute the package straight from the Ubuntu repos.

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ubuntu

I understand restricting redistribution of copyrighted branding/artwork but restricting distribution of non branded software is a violation of the GPL, correct?

I can't way for some GNU folk to make a website called boycottbUbuntu.org Tongue

GNU/FSF

This has already been done to some degree. In the wake of privacy abuses in Ubuntu (with CIA's special partner Amazon) I had discussions with RMS about it and in December 2012 I helped draft what RMS now references when he speaks about Ubuntu:

https://www.gnu.org/philosophy/ubuntu-spyware.html

There have been issues other than that, but I am still happy when I hear about people moving to Ubuntu. It's much better than using proprietary software.

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