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Leftovers: Applications

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Software
  • MOC: Meet the most lightweight and easy-to-install music player for Linux

    Music on Console aka MOC is perhaps the most lightweight and easy-to-install music player for Linux I have ever tested. And don't be intimidated by the fact that MOC is a console only player. Once you spend enough time with MOC, it becomes as easy to use as any other alternative music players for Linux. Moreover, if you're a fan of MPD plus NCMPC combination who doesn't like to jump through hoops just for installing and setting it up, MOC might be the alternative you have been looking for. It's right there in Ubuntu repositories by default.

  • Wine 1.7.12: Windows Media Player Interfaces Support

    The latest bi-weekly Wine development release is now available and it brings with it some noteworthy changes.

  • GNU Octave hits a high note

    MATLAB [1] has to be one of the all time greats for analyzing nearly any sort of data, just like a spreadsheet is for making a plot of data. Alas, these programs while powerful do have a limitation – they are costly and rightly so: They do a job, have great depth and are actively supported, and we all know that this takes some overhead dollars to maintain. For spreadsheets we have some really well done GNU options like Libre Office.[2] But what about our design programs?

    The GNU design software tends to be somewhat usable but unpolished in many cases; the same could be said about the many MATLAB-like GNU options. This one does that well, that one is a little different there, etc., but none of them "Hits a home run" on all counts, until now.

    GNU Octave [3] is the closest MATLAB-compatible program, with all the same language syntax, etc. In fact many basic MATLAB scripts will run without an issue in Octave. The biggest thing that held Octave back was the command line interface.

  • 5 Highly Promising Cross-Platform IDEs

More in Tux Machines

Android Leftovers

New LibreELEC Kodi Linux distro update arrives -- download it now!

Kodi is one of the best media centers available. Its cross-platform nature makes it usable on many different operating systems. Not only is it good for locally stored music and video, but with the use of add-ons, the sky is the limit. Fans of Premier League Football (soccer), for instance, can use Kodi to watch matches. Where Kodi really shines, however, is with Linux. More specifically, the best experience is when the media center is the star of the show. Luckily, there are some Linux distros that exist solely to run Kodi. One such popular distro is LibreELEC -- a fork of OpenELEC. Today, an update to that operating system becomes available and you can download it immediately. There are images available for Raspberry Pi, WeTek, and of course, x86_64. Read more

GNU/Linux for beginners: How Audio Works

One of the things that I found pretty confusing about GNU/Linux during my transition from using Windows as my primary OS to using GNU/Linux, was how audio worked. In Windows, you don’t really have to think about anything, or know how to configure any specific utilities for the most part; audio just works. You might need to install a driver for a new headset or soundcard but that’s about as heavy as things get. Audio in GNU/Linux has come a long way and nowadays functions fairly well when it comes to the simplicity that users migrating from Windows are accustomed to; but there are still some nuances and terms that new users may not be familiar with. Read more

Red Hat banishes Btrfs from RHEL

Red Hat has banished the Btrfs, the Oracle-created file system intended to help harden Linux's storage capabilities. The Deprecated Functionality List for Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7.4 explains the decision as follows: Read more