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Leftovers: Applications

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Software
  • MOC: Meet the most lightweight and easy-to-install music player for Linux

    Music on Console aka MOC is perhaps the most lightweight and easy-to-install music player for Linux I have ever tested. And don't be intimidated by the fact that MOC is a console only player. Once you spend enough time with MOC, it becomes as easy to use as any other alternative music players for Linux. Moreover, if you're a fan of MPD plus NCMPC combination who doesn't like to jump through hoops just for installing and setting it up, MOC might be the alternative you have been looking for. It's right there in Ubuntu repositories by default.

  • Wine 1.7.12: Windows Media Player Interfaces Support

    The latest bi-weekly Wine development release is now available and it brings with it some noteworthy changes.

  • GNU Octave hits a high note

    MATLAB [1] has to be one of the all time greats for analyzing nearly any sort of data, just like a spreadsheet is for making a plot of data. Alas, these programs while powerful do have a limitation – they are costly and rightly so: They do a job, have great depth and are actively supported, and we all know that this takes some overhead dollars to maintain. For spreadsheets we have some really well done GNU options like Libre Office.[2] But what about our design programs?

    The GNU design software tends to be somewhat usable but unpolished in many cases; the same could be said about the many MATLAB-like GNU options. This one does that well, that one is a little different there, etc., but none of them "Hits a home run" on all counts, until now.

    GNU Octave [3] is the closest MATLAB-compatible program, with all the same language syntax, etc. In fact many basic MATLAB scripts will run without an issue in Octave. The biggest thing that held Octave back was the command line interface.

  • 5 Highly Promising Cross-Platform IDEs

More in Tux Machines

Linux on Servers

Debian, Devuan, and Ubuntu

  • My Free Software Activities in April 2016
    I handled a new LTS sponsor that wanted to see wheezy keep supporting armel and armhf. This was not part of our initial plans (set during last Debconf) and I thus mailed all teams that were impacted if we were to collectively decide that it was OK to support those architectures. While I was hoping to get a clear answer rather quickly, it turns out that we never managed to get an answer to the question from all parties. Instead the discussion drifted on the more general topic of how we handle sponsorship/funding in the LTS project.
  • Initial Planning For Ubuntu 16.10 Today At UOS
    Beyond the announcement that Ubuntu 16.10 won't ship with Mir and Unity 8 by default, many other items were discussed for the Ubuntu 16.10 release due out in October.
  • Ubuntu 16.10 Isn't Going To Use Mir / Unity 8 By Default
    Well, another setback for Unity 8 and Mir. Kicking off the Ubuntu Online Summit for Ubuntu 16.10, it's been confirmed that the Unity 8 desktop and Mir display server will not be the default for the desktop spin. Similar to the current situation with existing Ubuntu releases, Unity 8 and Mir will be available as an opt-in feature for users wanting to upgrade their desktop, but Unity 7 and the faithful X.Org Server is planned to be the default for Ubuntu 16.10 Yakkety Yak.
  • Devuan Beta Release
    After two years in development, a beta release of the Devuan distro has made it into the world (Devuan is a registered trademark of the Dyne.org foundation). Devuan is a very Debian-ish distro. In fact, it basically is Debian, with one notable absence. Devuan doesn't use systemd. In fact, that's its main claim to fame. Devuan was created to offer an alternative to Debian fans who were alienated by the controversial switch to systemd.

Leftovers: OSS

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