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Docker Releases Faster, More Stable Version 0.8

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Linux

Even though this release does not focus on new features, there were still a few additions worth mentioning. Most of the features deal with making Docker faster, more efficient, and more stable. Docker added experimental support for the BTRFS (“butter fs”? “better fs”? I say butter) filesystem, which adds copy-on-write capability, and should open the door for more interesting functionality as development continues. The most intriguing new feature may turn out to be official support for running Docker on OS X. Apple has become very popular in the developer community in the past few years, especially among web developers. Official support for OS X will help the project gain even more traction.

Having the docker client run on OS X is really only part of the story though. Docker relies on Linux LXC containers, which is obviously not available in OS X. So, to work around this limitation, Docker created a new script that downloads a custom Linux iso from github and installs a new, very slim, VirtualBox VM with the Docker daemon running. The OS X native Docker binary then talks to this daemon to build and run Docker images. I gave the workflow a run through on my Mac, and it worked reasonably well. I was able to download, build, and run a Wordpress docker image with very little fuss.

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