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Justice

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Justice

I was born in a quiet and beautiful town in the Far East together with my cousins. As far as I can remember, we enjoyed watching the sunrise and sunset, bathing and fishing in the river along with other children. My childhood years bring back good memories: Playing hide and seek, flying kites, throwing yo-yo, jumping on Chinese garter and so much more. Life was full of fun and so simple back then. There were times I ate meals in our neighbours' house, treated like family. Sometimes we exchanged food. This you will never experience in an highly urbanised city, as there is nothing like this in the Western world. It's a small town where you almost know every other person. Everybody is like your family. That is how I remember the place that I left 24 years ago. This year my husband and I were planning to visit my beloved town. But I have second thoughts. It's a bit scary to visit a place where people are killing other people like animals.

Recently, I have heard that a lot of assassinations happened in the place, and two victims who died are known to me. What's wrong? What is this killing all about? This is inhumane. What kind of society will we have if we are killing people? This is unlawful; parents are raising their children with all the love and care, teaching them to respect others as they want to be respected. No parents want to harm their children nor others' (vice versa). STOP THE EXECUTION!!! We live in a society and we must act like social beings; barbarians belong in the wilderness, where there were no places for people without conscience. If you took life away with your own hands, you would pay for it in the end. "An eye for an eye, a tooth for a tooth". Justice for all the innocent victims, justice must be served for the family. We want our town back -- the one it used to be.

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Barbarian get a bad rap

Barbarians were not the dehumanized beasts they have been made out to be. Brutality is more the domain of the civilized. In fact, it was the barbarians that put a stop to ancient Rome's games, in which thousands were brutally slaughtered every month. Blame civilization, not the barbarians, for humanity's swing toward inhumanity.

Just to set the record straight.

Barbarians

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Barbarian

You might think I missed the word "Barbarian", so please refer to the above.

"In idiomatic or figurative usage, a "barbarian" may also be an individual reference to a brutal, cruel, warlike, insensitive person.[1]. This does not blame the Barbarian, it is the evolution of the word "Barbarian" which I chose to refer to uncivilised people who live in society but refuse to act as a social being.

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