Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Mandrake Derived Distros

Filed under
Linux

Todays special is about Mandrake derived distributions, namely,
OpenMandriva Lx 2014 alpha vs Mageia 4 final vs ROSA 2012 R2 final vs PCLinuxOS 2013.12 final.

In (my limited) testing, I've used the X86_64 versions favoring the KDE desktop, and I've used the NVidia binary drivers provided with each distro.

Here's my experience with each one:

1) OpenMandriva Lx 2014 alpha
This one installed just fine, but would not startup on first boot. Well, it's an alpha version, so this could be understood.

2) Mageia 4 final release
Developers ran across many many bugs during development. In my opinion, they released their final version about two weeks to a month before they should have. Check out their errata website. While I credit Mageia for the publishing this exhaustive list, it's very long.

For me, I couldn't get kdenlive, kate, and kwrite to launch from the menus. Kate and kwrite would launch from a terminal. Kdenlive just wouldn't start at all. This is attributed to an NVidia driver bug on the errata page.

I know the Mageia devs will fix everything, but it seems too bugridden for a final release.

3) PCLinuxOS 2013.12 final
PCLinuxOS has brought in a lot of code from other sources, so it's the furthest from being a Mandrake derived distro listed here. It runs very smooth--and my only criticisms were an older kernel, and the ruby release was only 1.8.7. (In my retirement, I still do some small development, and Ruby is one of my preferred interpreters). I still think PCLinuxOS is the best distro for new linux users.

4) ROSA 2012 R2 final
This was a surprise for me, but ROSA runs very well for me. I still have some testing to do, but it seems a very complete distro, and will remain on my "testing" machine for a while. I'm surprised this distro hasn't been more popular on DistroWatch.

Well, that's it for now, it's ROSA for me, with PCLinuxOS a close second. This could change over the next few months.

More in Tux Machines

GNOME/Unity in Ubuntu

today's howtos

Leftovers: Software (Subsurface, GRUB, GIMP, and Todo.txt)

  • Announcing Subsurface 4.6.4
    The Subsurface development team proudly announces the release 4.6.4 of Subsurface, an open source dive log and dive planning program for Windows, Mac and Linux.
  • Subsurface 4.6.4 Open-Source Dive Log and Planning Tool Adds Many Improvements
    The development team behind the Subsurface open-source dive log and dive planning application was proud to announce the immediate availability for download of the Subsurface 4.6.4 release. Subsurface 4.6.4 is the latest stable version of the popular program developed by Linus Torvalds in collaboration with other developers, and adds a great number of improvements over previous builds. These include a new planner mode to calculate minimum gas, better handling of notes when replanning dives, as well as support for the border width setting in printing templates.
  • GRUB 2.02 Bootloader Officially Released with ZFS LZ4 & LVM RAID1 Support, More
    The long-anticipated GRUB 2.02 open-source bootloader software project was finally promoted to the stable channel after being in Beta stages of development for the past few years. The development team took their time to finalize the release of GRUB 2.02, which should soon make its way into the stable software repositories of your favorite operating system, but it's finally here and we want to thank them for all their hard work and the awesome new features and improvements implemented so far.
  • [New] GIMP review
    GIMP (short for GNU Image Manipulation Program) is a free alternative to Photoshop that more than holds its own. But don't think that the lack of a price tag means GIMP is lacking in features; it packs enough punch to genuinely rival Adobe's imaging behemoth. GIMP comes with impressive selection and montage features, various ways to retouch your images, cropping, noise reduction and colour adjustment tools, customisable brushes, gradients and so much more. There's plenty for the more advanced user, too, including layer masks, bezier curves, filters and even an animation package.
  • Todo.txt – A Nifty ToDo Indicator Applet for Ubuntu
    Todo.txt is an extremely simple indicator applet that lets you quickly tick off the tasks contained in your todo.txt file. It lives in the system tray and has options: Edit todo.txt, Clear completed, and refresh. Ultimately, its job is to help you edit your todo.txt file and mark tasks as completed without needing to open a full-fledged text editing application.

Red Hat News