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About

Background

Tux Machines is a popular news site focusing on Free/libre and Open Source software, especially GNU/Linux. Founded by Susan (srlinuxx) in 2004, the site aims to share relevant news with its valued community of readers.

Scope of coverage

TuxThe site places great focus on GNU, Linux, and other intricate systems that utilise these, such as Android, Chrome OS, and Tizen. Of lesser interest are issues that relate purely to development and Free/Open Source software. Games, applications, instructional posts and proprietary software are habitually covered, but they are grouped and posted only periodically. Tux Machines is primarily focused on Linux, but it occasionally also covers BSD/UNIX, Minix, and lesser known operation systems. Some of our news sources include standards, antitrust and so on.

Contact Details

See our contacts page for up-to-date details. Communication is also facilitated by our forums.

Going Ads-free in 2013

Going forward, Tux Machines does not have ads. Instead it relies on readers' support and is run as a public service.

More in Tux Machines

Today in Techrights

8 Top Ubuntu server Web GUI Management Panels

Ubuntu Server with command-line interface might sound little bit wired to newbies because of no previous familiarization. Thus, if you are new to Ubuntu Linux server running on your local hardware or some Cloud hosting and planning to install some Linux Desktop Graphical environment (GUI) over it; I would like to recommend don’t, until and unless you don’t have supported hardware. Instead, think about free and open-source Ubuntu server Web GUI Management panels. Moreover, for a moment, you can think about Desktop Graphical environment for your local server but if you have some Linux cloud hosting server, never do it. I am saying this because Ubuntu or any other Linux server operating systems are built to run on low hardware resources, thus even old computer/server hardware can easily handle it. GUI means more RAM and hard disk storage space. Read more

Android Leftovers

Ubuntu 18.10 Cosmic Cuttlefish reaches end of life on Thursday, upgrade now

Canonical, earlier this month, announced that Ubuntu 18.10 Cosmic Cuttlefish will be reaching end-of-life status this Thursday, making now the ideal time to upgrade to a later version. As with all non-Long Term Support (LTS) releases, 18.10 had nine months of support following its release last October. When distributions reach their end-of-life stage, they no longer receive security updates. While you may be relatively safe at first, the longer you keep running an unpatched system, the more likely it is that your system will become compromised putting your data at risk. If you’d like to move on from Ubuntu 18.10, you’ve got two options; you can either perform a clean install of a more up-to-date version of Ubuntu or you can do an in-place upgrade. Read more