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Jan 2014 IT Skills Watch report: three IT skills on the rise

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Linux

In this article, we present the findings of the January’s update of IT Skills Watch. Additionally, we study the whole data gathered in the last year to explain some fluctuations in the demand for some IT skills of interest. As a highlight of this article, we identify three IT skills, whose demand has clearly risen during the past year. This may give you an indication for the IT skills you need to gain knowledge of to stay ahead in the Linux job market.

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