Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Suse 10.1 RC 1 Report

Filed under
Reviews
SUSE
-s

The beta cycle is history! I'm still sweeping up confetti here. OpenSUSE announced the availability of 10.1 release candidate 1 early this morning. I've actually been downloading the deltas lately and even though they come in fairly slow, it is much nicer downloading 300 mbs rather than 3 gigs. I highly recommend that method. I am in the process of downloading the full x86_64 version as well. It's coming in at a snails pace too, but hopefully I will be able to report on it before rc2 comes out. But back to the topic at hand. How did the release candidate do? Will this phase go as planned or will final have to be delayed? Here is my report.

Release Candidate phase implies feature and usually version freezes. As you can see from the small chart below, most applications received a teny number version upgrade, indicating an in-house bug fix or such. Those numbers actually indicate the number of builds, usually. So, if only one number difference, then only one build since the last build. With only 300mb difference in the iso package, we didn't really expect too many big changes.



10.1 beta9     10.1 rc1
Xorg 6.9.0-31 6.9.0-35
kdebase 3.5.1-49 3.5.1-54
gnome 2.12.2-17 2.12.2-18
gcc 4.1.0-10 4.1.0-16
firefox 1.5.0.1-19 1.5.0.1-22
OOo 2.0.2-12 2.0.2-15
kernel 2.6.16-8 2.6.16-20
gimp 2.2.10-16 2.2.10-17
gaim 1.5.0-44 1.5.0-45





In the changelog we find lots and lots of bug fixes and just a few new features. Some highlights include:

  • MozillaFirefox
    • added (optional) plastikfox theme
    • get some more security related patches
    • finally fixed the default proxy configuration by adding a new
      UI option
  • gnome-volume-manager
    • Add gnome-volume-properties back to the Control Center
  • wine
    • upstream 0.9.11
    • Fake dll files created in the system directory to help installers
    • Desktop mode now properly supports multiple processes
    • Several OpenGL fixes
    • Improved ESD audio driver
    • Direct3D 8 and 9 now use the same code
    • More Web browser support
    • Lots of bug fixes
  • banshee
    • Don't show error dialog if there were no errors burning the CD
    • Improved initial import dialog and mimetype detection for importing
    • Check to see if files exist before burning
    • Ensure any files Banshee has open on an iPod are closed before ejecting through HAL
    • Do not try to play audio through Helix that it cannot support
    • Only show the actual track that is playing in the view
  • gdm
    • Update .ICEauthority fixup patch, corrects serious security bug
  • kaffeine
    • Improve gstreamer 0.10 by getting visualization to work
  • kpowersave
    • rereleased official stable version 0.6
      • fixed detailed dialog for machines without CPUFreq support and more than one CPU/Core and/or throttling
      • added fix to be able to fake CPU info
      • fixed compiler warnings
  • kdebase3
    • Fix misplaced %endif
    • update medium->full hinting on a 10.1 update
    • fix possible Konsole crash on session saving/logout
    • fix panel configuration to not always ask to save
    • update media_hal.diff to make it possible that applications like k3b can stop automounting
    • fix wallpaper upgrade bug
  • beagle
    • Add a patch to add indicies to the sqlite database
    • Use cron.daily for running beagle-crawl-system
  • compiz
    • Changed default key-binding for scale plugin to F11
    • Fix darkenBack option in scale plugin
    • Don't start scale effect when some other plugin is running
    • Add flip_move option for only using edge flipping when moving windows
    • Support for screen edge flipping and hot corners
  • kdenetwork3
    • Fix serious bug where Idle status was set instead of Busy
  • xorg-x11
    • Do not use killall within the xdm scripts to avoid to kill xvkbd
      of other running sessions maybe local or remote
    • Avoid error message of not existent device tty0
  • Lots and lots of many many yast fixes
  • Full Changelog Since Beta 9



Some of the outstanding bugs they are still currently working on are:

  • Large scale testing showed a couple of issues especially with update of systems. I would advise everybody to be carefull in updating a system - and not update a production system (see below).
  • The bootloader shows "SUSE Linux 10.1 10.1"
  • Installation of packages from the installation source with rug/zen-installer fails in the installed system. We have put fixed packages (zen-updater, rug, libzypp-zmd-backend) for this on the ftp server, download them from here .
  • Updating from a previous beta tries to delete far too many packages. You should see conflicts for this in the installation proposal.
  • Every update adds another selection to the system
  • Installationsources are not available in the system
  • The YaST2 Xen module is not able to setup a VM.



The install of Suse 10.1 release candidate 1 went really well for me. Most the install would be a rehash if described in full again. It was almost "textbook" except for one little niggle. The downloading of Release Notes worked this time and then the next question concerns Online Updates. We are asked if we'd prefer to configure it now (recommended) or later, with check boxes for sending hardware and "other information" back. I click to configure now and it took quite a while. The clock cursor never did stop turning and switching to a console I could top and see that things were still happening. But this step took a really long time. Then after it reported there was a patch available and installed it (without error), it took another long time to finish whatever it was doing under the gui. But it did finish. That's the main thing.

After install, I didn't see any new eye candy or identify any new applications. The menus were still chocked full o' apps for almost every imaginable task and all but two opened and worked without issue. The two that did give me trouble were Kdetv and Zapping. Zapping froze up and crashed out and kdetv just wouldn't work properly. Maybe it's just me. I never have any luck with those apps anyway. But good ole xawtv performed as always - just almost perfectly.

        

There are all kinds of music programs ranging from merely playing to capture and edit. There wasn't enough screen space here to show all of them. In that same spirit are all the other categories. There are just too many office and internet apps, games, and development tools to list or screenshoot.

        

        

Gnome was working rather well this evening. Seems KDE will stay version 3.5.1 and gnome will stay 2.12 for 10.1. XGL Desktop was removed from the Gnome Control Center this time, as I speculate it won't be perfected in time for final release. I did test the display configuration in the GCC to set up xinerama, both cloned and expanded. That worked wonderfully.

        

The developers have been working so hard this release to rewrite the software package management suite. They've had a hard time of it. But I believe their efforts are beginning to pay off. The installation source manager worked wonderfully. I tested the package manager this time and had no problems. It installed and uninstalled without issue. The online update did as one might expect as well. It connected to some preset mirror(s) and downloaded the patch information. I selected a patch to install and it preceded to download and install it. I did experience trouble with the system update still as it reported an error stating that my os version number didn't match my install sources and then the summary screen reported conflicts it could not resolve (even though I had chosen no packages to install). But they are definitely getting there.

        

So, there ya have it. This is a definite release candidate. It's been a long beta cycle, but things are really shaping up quite nicely at this point. Everything was stable and almost everything was working fairly well. I think the look and feel are pretty much in place and we can expect to see very little change from here on out. Release candidate 2 is planned for next week and hopefully they will announce the final on or about the 25th.


More Screenshots Here.

Howto Apply Delta Isos:

This is really so easy that I hesitate to even mention it, but just in case someone needs to know, here's a handy copy and paste for this release:

  1. Have your last version isos available.
  2. Download the difference iso (delta iso).
  3. Open a terminal
  4. Apply the applydeltaiso command.
    • applydeltaiso SUSE-Linux-10.1-beta9-i386-CD1.iso SUSE-Linux-10.1-beta9_RC1-i386-CD1.delta.iso SUSE-Linux-10.1-RC1-i386-CD1.iso
    • applydeltaiso SUSE-Linux-10.1-beta9-i386-CD2.iso SUSE-Linux-10.1-beta9_RC1-i386-CD2.delta.iso SUSE-Linux-10.1-RC1-i386-CD2.iso
    • applydeltaiso SUSE-Linux-10.1-beta9-i386-CD3.iso SUSE-Linux-10.1-beta9_RC1-i386-CD3.delta.iso SUSE-Linux-10.1-RC1-i386-CD3.iso
    • applydeltaiso SUSE-Linux-10.1-beta9-i386-CD4.iso SUSE-Linux-10.1-beta9_RC1-i386-CD4.delta.iso SUSE-Linux-10.1-RC1-i386-CD4.iso
    • applydeltaiso SUSE-Linux-10.1-beta9-i386-CD5.iso SUSE-Linux-10.1-beta9_RC1-i386-CD5.delta.iso SUSE-Linux-10.1-RC1-i386-CD5.iso

More in Tux Machines

Scrivener Writing Software has a Linux Version

In some ways, Scrivener is the very embodiment of anti-Linux, philosophically. Scrivener is a writing program, used by authors. In Linux, one strings together well developed and intensely tested tools on data streams to produce a result. So, to author a complex project, create files and edit them in a simple text editor, using some markdown. Keep the files organized in the file system and use file names carefully chosen to keep them in order in their respective directories. when it comes time to make project-wide modifications, use grep and sed to process all of the files at once or selected files. Eventually, run the files through LaTeX to produce beautiful output. Then, put the final product in a directory where people can find it on Gopher.

Gopher? Anyway …

On the other hand, emacs is the ultimate linux program. Emacs is a text editor that is so powerful and has so many community-contributed “modes” (like add-ins) that it can be used as a word processor, an email client, a calendar, a PIM, a web browser, an operating system, to make coffee, or to stop that table with the short leg from rocking back and forth. So, in this sense, a piece of software that does everything is also linux, philosophically.

And so, Scrivener, despite what I said above, is in a way the very embodiment of Linux, philosophically.

I’ve been using Scrivener on a Mac for some time now, and a while back I tried it on Linux. Scrivener for the Mac is a commercial product you must pay money for, though it is not expensive, but the Linux version, being highly experimental and probably unsafe, is free. But then again, this is Linux. We eat unsafe experimental free software for breakfast. So much that we usually skip lunch. Because we’re still fixing breakfast. As it were.

Details with Screen Shots Here

Anyway, here’s what Scrivener does. It does everything. The full blown Mac version has more features than the Linux version, but both are feature rich. To me, the most important things are: A document is organised in “scenes” which can be willy nilly moved around in relation to each other in a linear or hierarchical system. The documents are recursive, so a document can hold other documents, and the default is to have only the text in the lower level document as part of the final product (though this is entirely optional). A document can be defined as a “folder” which is really just a document that has a file folder icon representing it to make you feel like it is a folder.

Associated with the project, and with each separate document, is a note taking area. So, you can jot notes project-wide as you work, like “Don’t forget to write the chapter where everyone dies at the end,” or you can write notes on a given document like “Is this where I should use the joke about the slushy in the bathroom at Target?” Each scene also has a number of attributes such as a “label” and a “status” and keywords. I think keywords may not be implemented in the Linux version yet.

Typically a project has one major folder that has all the actual writing distributed among scenes in it, and one or more additional folders in which you put stuff that is not in the product you are working on, but could be, or was but you pulled it out, or that includes research material.

You can work on one scene at a time. Scenes have meta-data and document notes.

The scenes, folders, and everything are all held together with a binder typically displayed on the left side of the Scrivener application window, showing the hierarchy. A number of templates come with the program to create pre-organized binder paradigms, or you can just create one from scratch. You can change the icons on the folders/scenes to remind you of what they are. When a scene is active in the central editing window, you can display an “inspector” on the right side, showing the card (I’ll get to that later) on top the meta data, and the document or project notes. In the Mac version you can create additional meta-data categories.

An individual scene can be displayed in the editing window. Or, scenes can be shown as a collection of scenes in what is known as “Scrivenings mode.” Scrivenings mode is more or less standard word processing mode where all the text is simply there to scroll through, though scene titles may or may not be shown (optional). A lot of people love the corkboard option. I remember when PZ Myers discovered Scrivener he raved about it. The corkboard is a corkboard (as you may have guessed) with 3 x 5 inch virtual index cards, one per scene, that you can move around and organize as though that was going to help you get your thoughts together. The corkboard has the scene title and some notes on what the scene is, which is yet another form of meta-data. I like the corkboard mode, but really, I don’t think it is the most useful features. Come for the corkboard, stay for the binder and the document and project notes!

Community chest: Storage firms need to pay open-source debts

Linux and *BSD have completely changed the storage market. They are the core of so many storage products, allowing startups and established vendors alike to bring new products to the market more rapidly than previously possible. Almost every vendor I talk to these days has built their system on top of these and then there are the number of vendors who are using Samba implementations for their NAS functionality. Sometimes they move on from Samba but almost all version 1 NAS boxen are built on top of it. Read more

Black Lab SDK 1.8 released

QT Creator - for QT 5 Gambas 3 - Visual Basic for Linux Ubuntu Quickly - Quick and dirty development tool for python emacs and Xemacs - Advanced Text Editor Anjuta and Glade - C++ RAD development tool for GTK Netbeans - Java development environment GNAT-GPS - IDE for the following programming languages. Ada, C, JavaScript, Pascal and Python Idle - IDE for Python Scite - Text Editor Read more

Did Red Hat’s CTO Walk – Or Was He Pushed?

He went on to say that some within Red Hat speculate that tensions between Stevens and Paul Cormier, Red Hat’s president of products and technologies, might be responsible, although there doesn’t appear to have been any current argument between the two. Cormier will take over Stevens’ duties until a replacement is found. Vaughan-Nichols also said that others at Red Hat had opined that Stevens might’ve left because he’d risen as high as he could within the company and with no new advancement opportunities open to him, he’d decided to move on. If this was the case, why did he leave so abruptly? Stevens had been at Red Hat for nearly ten years. If he was leaving merely because “I’ve done all I can here and it’s time to seek my fortune elsewhere,” we’d expect him to work out some kind of notice and stay on the job long enough for Red Hat to find a suitable replacement. Turning in a resignation that’s effective immediately is not the ideal way to walk out the door for the last time. It smells of burning bridges. Read more