Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Aqua Computer Premium water cooling kit

Filed under
Hardware
Reviews

Germany is arguably the country with the fastest and strongest growing water cooling products market on the planet. I do not know and can not possibly guess what caused this kind of growth, but it is most evident. I can think of at least 30 German water cooling product manufacturers in a single minute. one of the most reputable manufacturers in Germany for their quality and ease of use is Aqua Computer. Founded during the Spring of the year 2001, the company is dedicated to the research, assembly and manufacture of water cooling products. Their Aqua Premium kit is under the microscope today. Let us see what the Aqua Computer has to offer the hardware enthusiast.

The design of most German water cooling kits relies on low flow rates. This kit is no exception from other German manufacturers. The German water cooling 'standard' primarily uses 3/8" inside diameter tubing, instead of the 1/2" inside diameter used mostly in the USA and the UK. This kit steps down a little more, using 5/16" tubing for liquid flow. Considering the rest of the components provided, it surely relies on finesse a lot more than brute force and flow rates.

The kit comes in a very large box for a liquid cooling kit, measuring over half a square meter in size and 10cm thick. It really made me wonder why it was so large, as I knew what is included and knew that the contents couldn't ever possibly take up this much space. My curiosity was satisfied when I opened the box. The contents are all very well packaged and protected by very thick foam. The protective foam is about 5cm thick on top and at least 2cm thick towards the sides and between the components. All the components are protected by a single piece of foam and cut to exactly fit, so they can not move or bounce around at all during transportation. This is a packaging prepared for every conceivable situation. Whoever designed it must have had a lot of bad experiences with shipping companies in the past.

The Aqua Premium kit from Aqua Computer may be nothing very special or innovative, nothing far unlike many other kits available more or less. Nevertheless, it is a very ideal kit for use by beginners and overclockers that require a low noise solution. While I would not recommend it to the most hardcore of overclockers, who will want far more complex and powerful systems, all but these individuals can use it and be very satisfied. Performance is not stellar, but it is ideal for a water cooling kit designed for silence and ease of use in mind. Quality is excellent along with reliability. Ease of use is hard to improve any further from my point of view.

Summing up the above, I believe that the kit is well worth a 9 out of a 10 point score. It is a most excellent kit for a beginner to use and performs well enough to satisfy many a seasoned overclocker without the need of listening to a very noisy fan. Simply ideal for the market it is aimed at.

Full Review.

More in Tux Machines

This Script Updates Hosts Files Using a Multi-Source Unified Block List With Whitelisting

If you ever tinker with your hosts file, you should try running this script to automatically keep the file updated with the latest known ad servers, phishing sites and other web scum.

Read more

via DMT/Linux Blog

today's leftovers

  • FLOSS Weekly 417: OpenHMD
    Fredrik Hultin is the Co-founder of the OpenHMD project (together with Jakob Bornecrantz). OpenHMD aims to provide a Free and Open Source API and drivers for immersive technology, such as head-mounted displays with built-in head tracking. The project's aim is to implement support for as many devices as possible in a portable, cross-platform package.
  • My next EP will be released as a corrupted GPT image
    Endless OS is distributed as a compressed disk image, so you just write it to disk to install it. On first boot, it resizes itself to fill the whole disk. So, to “install” it to a file we decompress the image file, then extend it to the desired length. When booting, in principle we want to loopback-mount the image file and treat that as the root device. But there’s a problem: NTFS-3G, the most mature NTFS implementation for Linux, runs in userspace using FUSE. There are some practical problems arranging for the userspace processes to survive the transition out of the initramfs, but the bigger problem is that accessing a loopback-mounted image on an NTFS partition is slow, presumably because every disk access has an extra round-trip to userspace and back. Is there some way we can avoid this performance penalty?
  • This week in GTK+ – 31
    In this last week, the master branch of GTK+ has seen 52 commits, with 10254 lines added and 9466 lines removed.
  • Digest of Fedora 25 Reviews
    Fedora 25 has been out for 2 months and it seems like a very solid release, maybe the best in the history of the distro. And feedback from the press and users has also been very positive.
  • Monday's security updates
  • What does security and USB-C have in common?
    I've decided to create yet another security analogy! You can’t tell, but I’m very excited to do this. One of my long standing complaints about security is there are basically no good analogies that make sense. We always try to talk about auto safety, or food safety, or maybe building security, how about pollution. There’s always some sort of existing real world scenario we try warp and twist in a way so we can tell a security story that makes sense. So far they’ve all failed. The analogy always starts out strong, then something happens that makes everything fall apart. I imagine a big part of this is because security is really new, but it’s also really hard to understand. It’s just not something humans are good at understanding. [...] The TL;DR is essentially the world of USB-C cables is sort of a modern day wild west. There’s no way to really tell which ones are good and which ones are bad, so there are some people who test the cables. It’s nothing official, they’re basically volunteers doing this in their free time. Their feedback is literally the only real way to decide which cables are good and which are bad. That’s sort of crazy if you think about it.
  • NuTyX 8.2.93 released
  • Linux Top 3: Parted Magic, Quirky and Ultimate Edition
    Parted Magic is a very niche Linux distribution that many users first discover when they're trying to either re-partition a drive or recover data from an older system. The new Parted Magic 2017_01_08 release is an incremental update that follows the very large 2016_10_18 update that provided 800 updates.
  • How To Use Google Translate From Commandline In Linux
  • How to debug C programs in Linux using gdb
  • Use Docker remotely on Atomic Host
  • Ubuntu isn’t the only version of Linux that can run on Windows 10
  • OpenSUSE Linux lands on Windows 10
  • How to run openSUSE Leap 42.2 or SUSE Linux Enterprise Server 12 on Windows 10

Leftovers: Software and Games

Hardware With Linux

  • Raspberry Pi's new computer for industrial applications goes on sale
    The new Raspberry Pi single-board computer is smaller and cheaper than the last, but its makers aren’t expecting the same rush of buyers that previous models have seen. The Raspberry Pi Compute Module 3 will be more of a “slow burn,” than last year’s Raspberry Pi 3, its creator Eben Upton predicted. That’s because it’s designed not for school and home use but for industrial applications. To make use of it, buyers will first need to design a product with a slot on the circuit board to accommodate it and that, he said, will take time.
  • ZeroPhone — An Open Source, Dirt Cheap, Linux-powered Smartphone Is Here
    ZeroPhone is an open source smartphone that’s powered by Raspberry Pi Zero. It runs on Linux and you can make one for yourself using parts worth $50. One can use it to make calls and SMS, run apps, and pentesting. Soon, phone’s crowdfunding is also expected to go live.
  • MSI X99A RAIDER Plays Fine With Linux
    This shouldn't be a big surprise though given the Intel X99 chipset is now rather mature and in the past I've successfully tested the MSI X99A WORKSTATION and X99S SLI PLUS motherboards on Linux. The X99A RAIDER is lower cost than these other MSI X99 motherboards I've tested, which led me in its direction, and then sticking with MSI due to the success with these other boards and MSI being a supporter of Phoronix and encouraging our Linux hardware testing compared to some other vendors.
  • First 3.5-inch Kaby Lake SBC reaches market
    Axiomtek’s 3.5-inch CAPA500 SBC taps LGA1151-ready CPUs from Intel’s 7th and 6th Generations, and offers PCIe, dual GbE, and optional “ZIO” expansion. Axiomtek’s CAPA500 is the first 3.5-inch form-factor SBC that we’ve seen that supports Intel’s latest 7th Generation “Kaby Lake” processors. Kaby Lake is similar enough to the 6th Gen “Skylake” family, sharing 14nm fabrication, Intel Gen 9 Graphics, and other features, to enable the CAPA500 to support both 7th and 6th Gen Core i7/i5/i3 CPUs as long as they use an LGA1151 socket. Advantech’s Kaby Lake based AIMB-205 Mini-ITX board supports the same socket. The CAPA500 ships with an Intel H110 chipset, and a Q170 is optional.