Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Ubuntu: A ramble through Drake Lake

Filed under
Ubuntu

This is not a review. It is not fair to review a work in progress. It is not a preview either. Such has already been done. Besides, all too often both views degenerate into a list of everything that does not yet work. And! And! Even reviews of released Linux distributions often do little more than enumerate features that haven't been added yet, but are already present in the author's current favourite. So I won't cover in any great depth what is and is not in Dapper. If you want to mark for yourself each stride forward, please visit the testing pages linked to above. It will tell you what you need to know, and has pretty screen-shots besides.

I will not hide my bias either. Ubuntu is my Darling. It cradled me in its soft, brown arms, soothing the burns and blisters of years of Windows and RPMs. I will say this: Working with Dapper on standard desktop hardware is a pleasant experience. I have an AMD64 3500+ processor, 512MB of ram, a GeForce 4200, on-board sound and Ethernet, plus an old prism-based 11mbs wireless card. Nothing too new, nothing too old. Not even a printer or scanner to bang my head against.

Now let us take an x86 install CD. The graphical boot menu is a nice touch. In earlier versions you could hit the F8 key and everything would... sparkle. This is now gone, as it was never meant to be in the first place. Hit 'ENTER', and we are back into the blue, text-based installer.

Full Story.

More in Tux Machines

today's howtos

Leftovers: Gaming

Fedora 21 Alpha to release on Tuesday

Today the Fedora Engineering Steering Commitee held a “Go/No Go” meeting regarding the Fedora 21 alpha, and it was agreed that the current release candidates for Fedora 21 met the release criteria. With this decision, this means that Fedora 21 will be released on Tuesday September 23, 2014. Read more

Teaching open source changed my life

Teaching open source has been a breath of fresh air for myself and for many of our students because with the open source way, there are no official tests. There is no official certification for the majority of open source projects. And, there are no prescribed textbooks. In open source, no employer worth working for will ask for official proof of your abilities. A good employer will look at what you’ve done and ask you to showcase what you can do. Yes, it still helps to have a Computer Science degree, but the lack of one is often no drawback. Read more