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Leftovers: Graphics

Filed under
Linux

Includes a few repetitions

  • NVIDIA GeForce 700 Series On Linux Run Excellent
  • Intel's HD4600 versus AMD's 4600 on Linux ... with special guests

    Phoronix is continuing to test the performance of open source Linux drivers on Source Engine games with this installation focusing on the performance of the Haswell i7-4770K. They compare it to a number of RV770 based AMD GPUs as well as the newer HD 6450. As you can see in the result the performance of the HD 6450 and HD 4550 are almost exactly the same and are the only two Radeons that do not leave the Intel's GPU in the dust. If you have experience with the HD 4650 you have a very good idea as to how Intel's 4600 performs as the results are very similar.

  • Wayland's Weston Received New Features Yesterday

    There's been work on Weston to support run-time switchable renderers for Weston. That's now been accomplished and with the latest Git code it's easy to switch from Pixman to the OpenGL renderer. The debug binding of "mod-shift-space W" will now cause the compositor to switch from using the software-based Pixman renderer to the OpenGL renderer. This key-bind renderer switching is useful for debugging, stressing the run-time switchable renderer support, and there's cases where the OpenGL renderer isn't used right away by Weston since the Pixman renderer is able to start-up more quickly.

  • Khronos Keeps Advancing, Pushing Its Standards
  • AMD Radeon R9 290 On Linux
  • The State Of Mesa OpenGL GL3/GL4 Updated

    With the forthcoming release of Mesa 10.0 there is now OpenGL 3.2 and OpenGL 3.3 compliance. That compliance is for core Mesa and the Intel DRI driver. The Radeon and Nouveau drivers don't have as advanced OpenGL support since most of the upstream GL / GLSL enablement is done by Intel developers and thus the focus on their own driver while the Radeon/Nouveau support usually trails.

  • Libdrm 2.4.48 Has New Hardware Support

    Libdrm, the DRM library that interfaces between the user-space graphics components (namely Mesa and the X.Org drivers) with the Linux kernel DRM drivers, is now up to version 2.4.48. Big with libdrm 2.4.48 is Intel "Broadwell" and AMD Radeon "Hawaii" GPU support.

  • Perl Bindings Come For Wayland

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Zotac Nvidia Jetson TK1 review

The Jetson TK1, Nvidia’s first development board to be marketed at the general public, has taken a circuitous route to our shores. Unveiled at the company’s Graphics Technology Conference earlier this year, the board launched in the US at a headline-grabbing price of $192 but its international release was hampered by export regulations. Zotac, already an Nvidia partner for its graphics hardware, volunteered to sort things out and has partnered with Maplin to bring the board to the UK. In doing so, however, the price has become a little muddled. $192 – a clever dollar per GPU core – has become £199.99. Compared to Maplin’s other single-board computer, the sub-£30 Raspberry Pi, it’s a high-end item that could find itself priced out of the reach of the company’s usual customers. Read more

New Human Interface Guidelines for GNOME and GTK+

I’ve recently been hard at work on a new and updated version of the GNOME Human Interface Guidelines, and am pleased to announce that this will be ready for the upcoming 3.14 release. Over recent years, application design has evolved a huge amount. The web and native applications have become increasingly similar, and new design patterns have become the norm. During that period, those of us in the GNOME Design Team have worked with developers to expand the range of GTK+’s capabilities, and the result is a much more modern toolkit. Read more