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Interview with Gentoo/*BSD developer

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Interviews

For those of you who don't know (and I'm sure there are many), Gentoo/BSD is a relatively unheard-of project with aims of merging both Gentoo Linux and the BSD systems respectively into one operating system. The project, which is sponsored by Gentoo Linux, has goals of creating a hybrid operating system using BSD underlyings, such as the kernel and system libraries, with Gentoo's portage system (package manager), administration facilities and design principles integrated on top.

There are currently three subprojects branched off of the root Gentoo/BSD project including Gentoo/FreeBSD (just mentioned), Gentoo/OpenBSD and Gentoo/NetBSD. According to Gentoo/BSD's site, the developers are also working on starting up a DragonFlyBSD (dfly) branch as well. For now though, the dfly port is "still unofficial" so DragonFly fans shouldn't get their hopes up just yet Wink.

After stumbling across the project just a few weeks ago, I decided I wanted to know a little more about it and thought DaemonNews readers would too. So I subscribed to the gentoo-bsd mailing list to see if I could flag down any developer willing to forfeit some spare time and fill me in on the project. Fortunately, it was hardly a day later when Diego Pettenò, one of the primary developers working on Gentoo/BSD, replied back. It was then that I asked if he would be willing to conduct an interview with me regarding Gentoo/BSD, and he kindly agreed. So here it is everyone, enjoy!

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