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Theme, Ads, Format, Scope, Etc.

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Summary: Recent changes and plans for the future

THANKS to everyone who left some feedback (even negative feedback), I am better able to understand what the community wants and I will do my best to serve it. Last night I made news postings image-free and opinion-free. I also modified the theme somewhat, in largely additive ways, not detracting from what was in it beforehand. Except where there is an existing agreement to run ads, I have removed ad-related links and blocks. Google no longer accompanies visitors of this site (via AdSense) and the front page should make it simpler to find popular news. The snowflakes in the background are temporary and are probably here to stay during the winter (temporary) unless there is strong opposition to it.

Regarding scope, since this site is about Tux (as in the mascot of Linux), it is unlikely that there will be much BSD, Apple, and Microsoft news here. As I do in Diaspora, where I field the "Linux" account, much of the focus is on GNU, Linux and other parts of the GPL-licensed stack, including mobile/embedded. If you have suggestions (things you wish to see, things you wish would go away, etc.), please speak out. This helps a lot and it will make a big difference. Almost all the decisions I ever made are community-driven.

As most poll participants voted for both lists of links and standalone links, it is going to require some workflow adjustment at my end, especially the former type of postings (requiring accumulation of links by category). All the sources, from which items are selected for relevance, are going to be made public some time soon.

Feedback

Thanks for being receptive to feedback. I don't have much to say that hasn't already been said... personally I don't mind the theme changes. The look of tuxmachines has never been why I came here. Smile

I do appreciate your stepping back a bit from the "activism" tone as has been mentioned in other comments. Susan was always carefully neutral on the "firecracker" issues which made tuxmachines a bit more "even keel" and less sensationalistic (not that your other sites are sensationalistic -- you know what I mean). I think that tends to foster a bit more civil discourse here, which I've always enjoyed.

So thanks for listening when we've piped in, particularly on that subject.

- Trent

The signal/noise ratio

Mr_Shifty wrote:

The look of tuxmachines has never been why I came here. Smile

Yes, I always came to this site before any other site because the selection of the stories was simply better. I'll try to maintain good signal/noise ratio even if it means that fewer stories get posted.

Nice look!

With a few quick changes, you really made the website much more pleasant-looking. Of course, it's the least important aspect for a site like Tux Machines (another great idea to split it into 2 words), but it's an aspect nonetheless. Although I was quite upset that Susan sold the site for such little money, I have a good feeling you'll maintain (and even improve) the quality of the content. I can't imagine how in the world you manage to juggle so many web projects, but you seem to be handling it just fine. Greetings!

Continuity

ITLure wrote:

Although I was quite upset that Susan sold the site for such little money.

The cost was not high, but Susan wanted continuity and the hosting needs to move out of her house for personal reasons. I will keep everything running for decades to come.

Compare that to what happened to The H, Groklaw, Linux Devices, Desktop Linux, and many other Linux sites which were either taken offline or became inactive. I am still working with the founder of Linux Devices to bring back online the content of Linux Devices (bought by a company which took it offline -- that's about 10,000 full-length articles).

keep it up

I'm glad our negative feedback didn't dishearten you or something, cause we do appreciate your hard work. Keep it up!

PS. There is a vintage "Sidux vs Mint" article that sneaked into the Popular New Stories Smile

Re new stories

kabamaru wrote:

PS. There is a vintage "Sidux vs Mint" article that sneaked into the Popular New Stories Smile

I guess I'm doing something wrong then. Smile

Even new stories cannot be more popular than very old ones. Smile

I expect link summaries to be ready within days. To avoid posting duplicate links (ones that Susan already posted) I need to cluster a few more related ones.

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