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This is "See Ya Around"

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I started to say "this is goodbye," but just because I sold the site doesn't mean I won't be around Linuxville. I'm still writing at ostatic and I may turn up here now and again as well. I'll be looking around to expand my writing after the new year too, so you're not rid of me yet.

But the sale on has been completed. The move has not started, so there will be some weirdness with the site in the next week or four while things are relocated and ironed out.

The new owner of is Roy Schestowitz. I'm sure many of you recognize that name, he's probably best known for his site, a reaction to the Novell and Microsoft patent agreement of the mid-aughts. He also has another site call I think it is. Anyway, Roy has said he plans to carry on the tradition and avoid controversy here. I'll let him tell you more specificially himself any further details.

It's more emotional for me letting the site go than I anticipated. I started this site as a learning exercise never imagining anyone much would visit. I didn't realize it until just now, but this one little site change my life.

I can never thank all my visitors enough. A website is nothing without its visitors. Another final thank you to all who donated money and hardware to help me and tuxmachines over the years. You'd probably be surprised just how helpful that was.

So, this isn't the end of tuxmachines or me. We'll both still be around. I wish everyone every success in the future and keep on Linux'in!

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We'll miss you

Thanks for making what I consider to be the best Linux news portal, Susan. I've enjoyed it, and while I'll continue to do so (assuming it continues in a form that still works for me), I still wanted to say thanks for everything.

I always loved seeing my own posts make it to the tuxmachines feed (I'm the guy behind The Linux Critic blog), and I always appreciated the additional audience your picking up my posts that way provided. I also have always enjoyed the diverse viewpoints presented by the variety of other content you've always featured here, which is what has always kept me coming back here daily for the past 4 years or so.

Take care, and see you around!

- Trent

Hi Trent, Is this your site?

Hi Trent,

Is this your site? I'll try to keep an eye on it and share, where possible, relevant news.

That's me

Yup, that's my blog. Thanks!

Thank you...

Susan, congratulations on the sale. You will be missed.

Thanks, Susan

Thanks for maintaining this fine site, for posting the news, and for all your distro reviews. Congrats on the sale! Keep on writing.

- Andrew

All the best

Let me just say an era has come to an end. Thank you very much for all your hard work Susan, for pointing me to material when I still had to learn a great deal as a n00bie and later on for featuring some of my work on the blog. It made a huge difference. You reviews were also a great read and very detailed back when you still did them. I particularly enjoyed the Crux review and your early screenshots section. All the best. As you said, see ya 'round.

At the same time, welcome to Roy who I know from his site and from Good to know the tradition will continue.

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