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Tuxmachines.org for sale (update)

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I've decided to try and see if anyone might be interested in buying and doing something with my domain and site. So, today, I'm posting this ad here: tuxmachines.org for sale.

I'm just getting too old and tired to keep the site up with way it and its loyal visitors deserve. It may get better next spring, but this fall I'll end up losing all my visitors I'm afraid.

I don't have any unrealistic ideas of what this site is worth or what anyone might pay, especially these days. I'll entertain any offer and will probably accept much lower than one might think.

So, if you'd like to have your own Linux site and don't want to start from scratch, here's a perfect choice. You'll get the artwork, theme, database, files, pictures, domain name (and anything else I may have forgotten) - or just the domain - whatever you want.

Just make an offer to srlinuxx at gmail dot com.

PS. I guess if the site doesn't sell, things will continue to be slow through the new year, but I'm hoping things will be better then*. I'll continue to do my best, so, keep your bookmarks or news feeds, please.

* I'll blog more about this later.


--Update Oct 25, 2013--

As of today, I have two offers for $1000, an offer to help (which I am still considering), and one with some questions (I'll try to answer today). With the two bids of the same amount, the first will take precedence.

For those submitting bids and visitors who are interested, I will have to decide within the next several days as it's not proper to keep these bidders waiting.

If anyone else is interested in submitting a bid, I will probably decide by Monday. Right now, I am leaning toward accepting the first $1000 bid unless it is outbid.

Thanks for all the letters, I've read them all and will answer them all by Monday evening.

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Thanks

Hi,

I would really regret if you would sell tm.org. It is one of the best resources for news around Linux and Free Software. But I understand that's a lot of work to do. Maybe we can support you in other ways, e.g. add some news so that you do not have all the work to do on your own.

Greets
Marcus

This is sad

I have been a member for 7 years and a half now. Sad
I obviously don't have server logs like you do but the website does not look dead.
If you need help, just ask. Maybe of us would love to help with news or even advertising for the website (for free of course).

8 years 19 weeks with Tuxmachines.org

I was using Linux for about 1.5 years when I discovered Tuxmachines. Back then, I was still teaching high school computer science (before I retired), and by the time I discovered Tuxmachines, I started teaching some Linux stuff, and maintained an in-school linux server.

Over the years reading Tuxmachines articles helped me greatly, and resulted in better Computer Science education for scads of students.

As well as running a terrific Linux site, Susan Linton (srlinuxx) was always very helpful and gracious when I wrote to her asking questions.

Thanks for all of it, Susan.

all in one place

I visit tuxmachines every day to keep myself up-to-date with the happenings in the linux world & having access to all this information from one website saves so much time otherwise trailing dozens of individual sites.
thanks for everything & good luck

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