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Ubuntu 13.10 vs. Ubuntu 13.04: Reasons to Upgrade

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Ubuntu

Ubuntu 13.10 (Saucy Salamander) is scheduled for launch on October 17, but users of the previous operating systems from Canonical are wondering why they should upgrade at all, given the fact that the new one doesn't seem to have too many features.

Canonical has been focusing on quality and on improving the existing features rather than making any drastic changes. This meant that the last two versions of Ubuntu didn't have much to show for, at least on the surface.

Ubuntu 13.04 (Raring Ringtail) has been called boring, among other things, but people don't realize that a lot of work is put behind every release of Ubuntu, even if it's not accompanied by any major visual changes.

So, why should you upgrade to Ubuntu 13.10 if there won't be any noticeable changes for the average user?




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