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KDE vs GNOME: Settings, Apps, Widgets

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KDE
Software

When it comes to desktop environments, choosing the one that's right for you can be a deeply personal matter. In this article, I'll look into the differences between two of the most popular Linux desktop environments – Gnome and KDE. I’ll explore what each desktop environment offers, comparing their strengths and weaknesses.

Initial impressions

Upon first encountering the desktop, one can argue that KDE looks more polished than Gnome, and offers a more tech-friendly appearance. Additionally, if you are used to a Windows environment, KDE will feel much more familiar, thanks to the menu and button layout at the bottom of your screen. You can easily locate the K menu, launch programs and find documents with just a few clicks of your mouse.

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