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Manjaro 0.8.7 "Ascella" XFCE Review: Superb performance with professional looks

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Linux

When I bought the machine in 2009, it had WinXP as the only OS. But, with time my interest in Linux increased. My netbook is too weak for GNOME3 or KDE4. But now it seems my search has ended finally. Last week, as a part of my weekly ritual of testing newly released distros, I downloaded Manjaro 0.8.7 32-bit, released on 26th Aug. 2013.

I made a live USB with Unetbootin and a live boot followed by installation to my usual test machine, Asus K54C with 2.2 Ghz Core i3 processor and 2 GB RAM. It has Intel graphics only. The distro booted up throwing a lot of verbose text - pretty unusual considering most of the distros do boot up these days with nice looking graphical boot splashes!

Specification-wise, Manjaro 0.8.7 has LTS Linux kernel 3.4.60 and XFCE 4.10 with Thunar 1.6.3 as the file manager. Ubuntu repos have already got XFCE 4.12 but no such luck in Arch repos yet. However, it makes sense for a stable release to continue with XFCE 4.10.

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