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Making the ultimate creative content OS from bits of Windows, Mac, and Linux

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OS

The recent unveiling of the Mac Pro has divided a lot of professional users who hoped Apple wouldn't fix what wasn't broken. Phil Schiller's words from the announcement—"can't innovate anymore, my ass"—made it clear that Apple used the venerable workstation as a Guinea pig to prove that it can still get its machined-aluminum groove on. Sure, the design and engineering of the Darth Pro are brilliant, but as I pointed out in my critical look, the Mac Pro needed shrinking as urgently as I need a Hermès man-purse. Whether it will pay off remains to be seen, but some people who want more flexible hardware options aren't convinced. I know one video editor who's already abandoned OS X for Windows because their work depends more on GPU power with apps like DaVinci Resolve. A big box with multiple PCI Express slots is more important to them than added desk space.

As it stands, I've come away with the impression that there is a lot of room for improvement in dealing with creative content in today's OSes. So in effect, this is a guide on how to create the ultimate OS for creatives by taking what OS X, Windows, and Linux do right—and wrong—for serious creative professional work. The end result should be a guide on how to make ÜberCreate OS 1.0.

OK, so what does “creative” mean?

I'm not here to debate that coders or accountants aren't creative people too. But in this context, "creative" users are professional content creators—photographers, video editors, compositors, Web designers, architects, graphic designers, art directors, 3D animators, audio engineers, etc.

rest here




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