Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

KWheezy 1.1 Full Review

Filed under
Linux
Reviews

KWheezy is a Debian based Linux operating system developed for general use of desktop computing. It features pre-configured KDE desktop and a very good selection of GNU/Linux and Open Source software. It is fully featured with popular applications such as plugins, drivers, fonts, media codecs that you need on a regular basis.

Features

100% compatible with Debian 7.1
Virtual Box to run multiple guest operating systems.
Jitsi (multi-instant protocol messaging with audio and video calling).
WINE (Windows compatible layer).
Audacity (Sound editor) and Kdenlive (video editor).
Imagination (DVD slideshow creator).
PDFMod (you can merge re-arrange and split PDF documents).
It has Inbuilt Remastering tool.
VLC and Clementine music player.
Pre-installed all plugins drivers and media codecs.
Gimp, Krita (bitmap graphics editors)
It is Fast and more reliable than Windows.
User friendly and Flexible desktop computing experience.
Get huge bundle of free software’s in the App Store.
Multiple Languages support

rest here




More in Tux Machines

GNOME 3.26 "Manchester" Desktop Environment Slated for Release on September 13

The GNOME Project published today the preliminary release schedule for the next major version of the popular GNOME desktop environment, GNOME 3.26, whose development will start very soon. Read more Also: GNOME 3.26 Release Schedule Published

SUSE Linux Enterprise High Availability Extension

Historically, data replication has been available only piecemeal through proprietary vendors. In a quest to remediate history, SUSE and partner LINBIT announced a solution that promises to change the economics of data replication. The two companies' collaborative effort is the headliner in the updated SUSE Linux Enterprise High Availability Extension, which now includes LINBIT's integrated geo-clustering technology. Read more

Tizen and Android

Open source is mission critical for Europe’s air traffic

It is entirely possible to use open source in a highly regulated environment such as air traffic control, says Dr Gerolf Ziegenhain, Head of Linux Competence & Service Centre (LCSC) in Mainz (Germany). Open source service providers can shield an organisation from the wide variety of development processes in the open source community. Read more