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Cloverleaf to Become openSUSE Add-on

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Linux
Software
SUSE

Not long ago the Fuduntu team announced the end of their popular Fedora-based distribution due to developmental issues and later decided to offer an openSUSE based one. But yesterday, Shawn W. Dunn announced that distro would never see the light of day.

In an announcement on the Cloverleaf Website Dunn said due to manpower shortages, the openSUSE-based distribution would not be possible. As an alternative, the guys will maintain an addon repository for their "kernel, Mesa, Wine, Netflix-desktop and/or Pipelight, KlyDE, and Consort, targeting openSUSE:12.3 and openSUSE:Factory. Our repositories on OBS are not going anywhere, and may be added to any installation of openSUSE:12.3 or openSUSE:Factory."

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