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PrBoom Version 2.4.1 is released

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Gaming

8th April 2006

Version 2.4.1 is released.

  • PrBoom demos are now recorded with high-precision turning (like the "Doom v1.91" hack that is floating around)
  • when both -nodraw and -nosound are supplied, then no graphics will be initialized and no windows opened
  • add ultdoom compatibility level, and bring compatibility levels into line with Prboom+
  • screenshots now use correct palette in software mode
  • screenshots now in PNG format on Linux/Unix where available
  • suppress use-supershotgun key in compatibility mode
  • removed obsolete video related code
  • fix screenshots on 64bit systems
  • fix comp_666

2nd April 2006

Version 2.4.0 is released. This is based on 2.2.6 and includes various
improvements from 2.3.1 and PrBoom+. Special thanks to Andrey 'e6y' Budko
for his bugfixes and his help to add them to PrBoom!

  • emulate reject overflows and spechit overflows - from prboom-plus
  • more original doom compatibility options
  • improve stretched graphics drawing for hires
  • fix super-shotgun reload on last shot
  • fix compilation with gcc 4.x
  • fix some more dehacked support problems (e.g. Hacx)
  • fix crash if pwad contains zero-length sound lumps
  • added possibility to use mmap for wad access, this leads to less memory usage
  • simplified the memory handling
  • removed old Doom v1.2 lumps from prboom.wad
  • windows also uses prboom.wad now
  • add Mac OS X bundle build
  • removed lumps and tables which are in prboom.wad from source



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