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Moving from OS X to Linux: Day One

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Linux

The thought of using Linux as a manager in a highly Windows- and Mac-centric corporate environment isn’t something to be taken lightly. Integrating with Active Directory, wrangling email with Microsoft Exchange, and taming quirky Microsoft office documents can be a challenge even with a well-equipped Mac. I decided to make a change after using a Mac at Rackspace for six years.

Let’s get one thing straight: I’m not a Windows or Mac basher. Windows 7 has been a solid performer for me and OS X has an amazing UI (and a vibrant community around it). I can’t make any sense out of Windows 8, but I’ve heard some positive things about it on tablets.

My main goal for switching to Linux is to reduce clutter. I moved away from the iPhone to Android last year because the Android gave me finer-grained controls over my phone and allowed me to troubleshoot my own problems. The Mac was working well for me, but as each release passed, it seems like more things were out of my control and I was constantly notified of something that my computer wanted me to do.

While at this year’s Red Hat Summit, I saw someone using Linux on a laptop and I asked: “How do you survive on Linux at your office?” He confided that his office is extremely Windows-centric and that it was tough to overcome in the beginning. When I asked why he stuck with Linux, he smiled and responded quickly: “When I use Linux, I feel like I can do my work without being bothered. Reducing clutter has saved me a ton of time.”

In an effort to free up my time at work for the important stuff, I’m moving to Linux.




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