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Hand of Thief malware could be dangerous (if you install it)

Filed under
Linux
Security

This past week marked one of the first times I've seen the media actually present a real "warning" to Linux users. That warning was about the new “Hand of Thief” trojan that targets Linux desktop systems to steal bank account information. What this trojan does is use a form grabber to steal login credentials of those using Internet banking. The trojan captures the URL, username, password, and timestamp of when you logged in. Once the information is captured, it's sent to a control server and then sold.

The Hand of Thief trojan is rumored to work on 15 different Linux distributions (including Ubuntu, Fedora, and Debian) and attacks all common web browsers. The stolen information is currently being sold in closed cybercrime communities for $2,000.00 (USD), and that price includes free updates.

What does this mean?




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