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Amarok 2.8 Out, Brings Loads of New Features

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Software

There used to be a time when people died of Amarok deficiency. No, really! At least the audiophiles who also happened to be Linux users. Music on KDE meant "Amarok." GNOME users would install half the KDE just to get their hands on Amarok. At its peak, Amarok had a huge fanbase that impatiently waited for new releases of their beloved music player. Times changed, Qt 4 came out and Amarok made the transition from Qt 3 to Qt 4 for its user interface. Leaving behind its immensely successful 1.4.x series, Amarok received a lot of flak for its revamped UI in 2.x. Fans were angry with the completely revised UI, and the Amarok dev team was unwilling to support the older design. This gave rise to Clementine and Exaile, both of which resembled Amarok of yesteryear, especially Clementine which was forked directly from Amarok's 1.4.x branch.

Five years hence, Amarok doesn't have as much fanfare as it had back in its day, and its development has slowed down a bit. But the team is still hard at work in putting out quality new releases. Amarok 2.8 comes exactly three months after v2.7.1 "Harbinger" with a good handful of new features and a bucketful of bugfixes. It now depends on Qt 4.8.3. So get the dependencies in place before installing Amarok 2.8.

rest ehre




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