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Only 'freaks' waste their time with Linux in Oklahoma

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Linux

For the last two weeks, the Linux army has seized on Tuttle, Oklahoma city manager Jerry Taylor as a symbol of all that's wrong with the world. This man attacked Linux maker CentOS without cause, threatened to call the FBI on the firm and refused to apologize for these actions even after learning the error of his ways. Typical Microsoft-loving, bureaucrat thinking, right?

Our ongoing investigation into Taylor, however, has revealed that he may actually be a model for Linux zealots to embrace and follow.

One Oklahoma news station caught onto the situation and profiled Tuttle as an "international laughing stock." The Oklahoman newspaper also had a go at Tuttle and Taylor. (Incidentally, the paper is still trying to figure out what "the registry" is. Stay tuned.)

Taylor had invited such media attention. "I have no fear of the media, in fact I welcome this publicity," he told CentOS.
That was until the media attention arrived. He asked us to stop writing about him, pulled his e-mail address off the Tuttle city web site and left the office when the TV crew showed up to interview him.

So, how can a man calls Linux a hobby project for "freaks" be a model for the open source community?

Full Story.

Sad but True

I've done consulting work for small local governments like this Tuttle place, and I can tell you that this Taylor moron is the norm, not the exception.

Seems like local government and public education are a magnet attracting only stupid people to work for them (which makes sense when you consider the low pay, crappy work environments, and plenty of petty ego's to stroke, if you had any brains at all, you'd work in the private sector).

The sad part is that the citizens not only pay for such substandard humans, but actually vote for them in most cases.

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